Lakehead Orillia’s Fast Pass program eases the transition to university for new students

July 23, 2013 – Orillia, ON 

Mitchell Sarjeant, Danielle Douglas and Annaleece Teape were among the many students who attended last week’s Fast Pass pre-orientation program at the Orillia campus of Lakehead University. The half-day session is aimed at easing new students’ transition to university life.

Mitchell Sarjeant, Danielle Douglas and Annaleece Teape were among the many students who attended last week’s Fast Pass pre-orientation program at the Orillia campus of Lakehead University. The half-day session is aimed at easing new students’ transition to university life.

For most new students, leaving home and heading off to university is a milestone tinged with equal parts excitement and anxiety. To help ease what can be a difficult transition, Lakehead University opened its doors this month to welcome new students – and their families – for an advance orientation.

The unique summer program, called “Fast Pass,” is a half-day orientation with multiple information sessions and tours that allows first-year students to get a sense of their new academic home.

“This is the second year we’ve run the program and it’s been very popular,” said Simon Looker, Lakehead student affairs officer, who presented a well-attended seminar, ‘Money, Money, Money.’ “We have had a lot of students recommend Fast Pass to others, which tells you how well the program helps.”

In addition to Looker’s presentation – which went over the nuts and bolts of paying tuition, upcoming financial deadlines, government assistance programs and myriad other details – there were also seminars focused on the top ten questions new students have, life in residence, the student union and the bookstore.

New students appreciated the program, which continues to gain in popularity.

“I wanted to get a head start so that I didn’t feel intimidated or overwhelmed in September,” said Danielle Douglas, a 19-year-old from Toronto who will begin her social work program in the fall.

“I wanted to be in a smaller community and Lakehead has smaller classes, which is a better learning environment,” she said.

That was a sentiment echoed by Annaleece Teape.

“Honestly, I liked the idea of a smaller campus, away from the hustle and bustle and just the natural setting here,” said Teape, 18. “I was very attracted to Lakehead.”

She said she was impressed by the new 271-bed campus residence.

“I was not aware that the residence building was so new, but upon my arrival I discovered that the rooms were very spacious and I was very happy with it. It made me very excited about my first year living in residence,” said the Stouffville native.

She was also impressed with the practical information Fast Pass provided.

“I came so I could learn how to navigate around the campus and to have some of my questions answered,” she said. “It really helped … and now I feel comfortable about coming here in the fall.”

Oro-Medonte’s Mitchell Sarjeant, 17, said he is happy he can go to university close to home and save money by living at home while pursuing his interdisciplinary studies.

“I like the idea of being at a small university where you get to know the professors and they know you by your name,” said Sarjeant. “That really appealed to me.”

The Fast Pass program also embraced students’ families and supporters. Parents and guests were encouraged to attend the information sessions with students. And during the second half of the program, when students met with academic advisors to learn more about their programs and course selections, parents were invited to a session designed for them.

At the “Supporting Your Student” session, Jim Wylie, one of Lakehead Orillia’s personal counsellors, led a discussion about how parents can be involved, and talked about on-campus services, supporting independence and various other issues. In addition, a panel of parents talked about their own students’ experience, what worked and pitfalls to avoid.

“I think, as parents, it’s a time to recognize that you did a good job of getting them here and now it’s their time to shine,” said panelist Carol Deimling, a parent of two university graduates. “My kids told me to tell you to encourage your children to get involved with athletic and other extra-curricular activities. That’s the best way to meet new people.”

Wylie stressed that the adjustment to university life is one the entire family makes.

“You go from a time when they are kids, when you are totally responsible for their every need 24 hours a day to a time when they are moving away and moving toward independence,” he said. “It’s an adjustment for all families and we are here to help you with that adjustment.”

Many parents were thankful for the support.

“I think we all feel a lot more comfortable about the coming year now,” said Laura Deschamps who, along with husband Paul, participated in the events with their son, Mitchell. “I think it’s a good idea to have the opportunity to come, to see the residence where he will live, to meet some of his professors … I’m glad we came.”

- 30 -

Lakehead Media Studies class inspires students to make a difference

Lakehead University Packet & Times column – December 12, 2013

Lakehead Media Studies class inspires students to make a difference

by Julie-Line Puckering

Hello! My name is Julie-Line Puckering (but everyone just calls me Julie), and I hail from Toronto. I’m a third year student in the Honours Bachelor of Arts and Science (HBASc) program, majoring in Media Studies for Social Change.

Last month, the Media Art & Activism class, taught by Lakehead’s Dr. Sandra Jeppesen, put together what is called a “protestival.” This is essentially a protest-festival, where we include an element of fun and interaction. A more worldly example of a protestival would be the Toronto Pride Parade – protesting in an inclusive, non-violent way. Our cause?  – to bring composting to the Lakehead Orillia campus.

Our class spent considerable time planning and creating the protestival event, which consisted of an information and activity centre on campus where we involved students in displays, giant bake sale, photo booth, and questions and answers.

This was the first year that the Media Art & Activism class was offered at Lakehead, so no one really knew what to expect. The class was open to any student in third or fourth year, so as Media Studies students, we were introduced to students with different media and artistic backgrounds. The course was an option for students with an interest in creativity or social justice, such as Julia Warner, an Education student, who said she was drawn to the course because of the unique blend of arts and activism.

We learned about the four main types of media (print, audio/visual, internet and street) and how activist groups take advantage of these different methods in order to get their message out to the world. There were many guest speakers from different activist causes that came to talk to us in class about their experiences in the real world.

The guest speakers were helpful in aiding us in our first task – learning how to make decisions and come to a consensus without a designated group leader. Being a class of 20-plus students, it was nearly impossible to have everyone agree on everything. However, since we were learning to take a horizontal stance on decision-making, we needed to learn to listen to the ideas of others and learn to let go of our own stubbornness in order to keep moving forward in the planning process.

After coming to an agreement on a topic for our protestival, we needed to come up with our mandate and demands. It took several weeks, and many lively discussions, and in the end, we were able to agree on our mandate: “To mobilize, influence, and motivate the student population and Lakehead community to utilize and promote green initiatives.”  We also identified three specific demands: the implementation of an on-campus composting program, the creation of a community garden, and the active use of the campus rainwater retention system. Based on these demands, we were able to start using different forms of media in order to promote our campaign and get our message out.

Posters and decorative compost bins were placed around the school in order to get the attention of students, staff and faculty. Some of the posters were filled with information about our demands, while others were simply hand-drawn illustrations depicting a rotting banana, with the words “Compost NOW.”  We also set up a Facebook page where visitors could find information about the status of Lakehead’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) certification, and were invited to join and support our cause. During the actual protestival, a group of students rocked out on a guitar and drummed on a compost bin to create music. And, of course, we occupied a fair amount of space in the Learning Commons, which attracted people passing by and brought attention to our cause.

The course required only one individual paper [assignment]; aside from that, it was primarily a group-centered class that involved everyone in some way. As my classmate Hailey Mulhall said, "This is the first time that I have gotten to know everyone in my class... it's pretty awesome.” Julia Warner added, "The experience has made me want to get more involved... before I took this course, I tended to stay in the background."

Overall, this course was pretty amazing. Sure, there were a lot of stressful moments, and yes, there were times when we wanted to give up. However, we never did. We kept pushing and going forward. This class really brought out the strength that students have and made us delve deeper into real issues. This class made us take another look at the world, and how we can help fix it. This class was a lot of fun – we were able to speak our minds, argue with each other, and have the opportunity to make a difference.

– 30 –

Lakehead students Hailey Mulhall and Julie Puckering present a "zine" that was created (using one sheet of paper) to provide information about the University's environmental practices for a unique class project that resulted in a “protestival.”

Lakehead students Hailey Mulhall and Julie Puckering present a "zine" that was created (using one sheet of paper) to provide information about the University's environmental practices for a unique class project that resulted in a “protestival.”

Students prepare for teaching careers by building digital self-portraits

December 2013 - Article for Huronia Business Times

What is your digital self-portrait, and why is it important?

This is what some of Lakehead’s Education students are learning in a unique course called Digital Teaching and Learning. The course was originally created to provide Concurrent Education students with awareness of educational technology in elementary school environments. The course design now includes a focus on digital citizenship and online safety, and also encourages students to think about who they are in digital environments – as a student, and as an aspiring teacher.

I recently spoke to the course instructor, Helen DeWaard, to learn more about this interesting program.

What is a digital self-portrait and why is it part of your course?

In this course, the self-portrait is the culmination of everything the students have done in class and their final assignment. The result is an online resource in the form of a blog that includes links, images, audios, video and other Web 2.0 activities.

At the end of the course, the students will be able to walk away with something that will take them into a work environment. This is something that many others – students, teachers, entrepreneurs, small business owners and large corporations – are learning how to do in digital spaces.

What the students end up with is a showcase of their skills and interests in an authentic, collaborative and networked community. It describes who they are as a learner and who they will become as a teacher; it’s a way for the students to represent their skills, interests and passions. 

What do the students learn from the course?

Students come into the course with a variety of experiences gained from using digital technologies in their personal life – such as Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, and Pinterest – and at school with online resources and basic software programs. By the end of the course, the door to Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 resources is pushed wide open and the potential found in the digital world is exposed. Each week the students explore new web-based tools for collaboration, creation, curation, and communication.

Students learn that technology doesn’t limit or create learning. They learn that teaching comes from learning and trying things, making mistakes and fixing things. They learn that this happens in collaborative, collective spaces – face-to-face, or online. Asking big questions, finding their way around web technologies, constructing and creating messages for unknown audiences and being comfortable with uncertainty, are all elements that students learn in this course.

Why is this course important for Education students?

Teaching is about telling stories and making those stories memorable. Teachers need to tell their own story – just like a small business that needs to tell its story and make it compelling so others will become engaged and become customers. Teachers are sharing their enthusiasm for learning by becoming visible champions of their products – be it math, literacy, history, or physical education. Where better to do this than in digital spaces where others can be motivated by their message – anytime, anywhere.

Every teacher needs to be involved with, and understand, digital spaces because their students, the students’ parents, and others, are actively participating in these environments. In order to become aware and comfortable in a digital ‘skin’, students who aspire to become teachers need to practice their digital skills in a safe space and be able to make mistakes that won’t have a negative impact on their professional online presence.

What is the response from students to the course?

At the end of the course, students are asked to reflect on the process of creating their digital self-portrait. Many of the students entered the course feeling somewhat intimidated by new technologies, but it didn’t take them long to feel comfortable and have fun exploring. One student commented that it was a lot more fun to create your own blog than write another essay.

 

What students take from this course are not just the digital skills they have explored, but the ‘soft skills’ that any business looks for in a potential employee – communication, collaboration and initiative. Students have said they especially enjoyed the collaboration aspects of the course, both in the classroom and online. They are all looking forward to using their new digital skills in their future careers, whether in the classroom, or elsewhere.

 

– 30 –

Helen DeWaard, instructor of Digital Teaching and Learning, a unique, new course offered to Education students at Lakehead University’s Orillia campus.
 

Helen DeWaard, instructor of Digital Teaching and Learning, a unique, new course offered to Education students at Lakehead University’s Orillia campus.

Lakehead University Holds National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women

Lakehead University student Jake Hume places a candle next to photos of the 14 women who were killed at École Polytechnique de Montréal in 1989.

Lakehead University student Jake Hume places a candle next to photos of the 14 women who were killed at École Polytechnique de Montréal in 1989.

December 6, 2013 ­­— Thunder Bay, ON

It will take a community approach to end violence against women, said Jayal Chung, Coordinator of Lakehead University’s Gender Issues Centre on today’s National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women.

“Violence against women is a human rights issue. Everyone can begin to address gender-violence by becoming aware of the oppressive structures that support violence and reflecting on the attitudes we hold about women.

“Today’s ceremony is a reminder that gender-violence still exists. It’s a chance to reflect on the daily actions we can do and the greater political actions we can influence to end violence against women. We need to keep working towards a society that is safer and more inclusive, both on and off campus,” Chung said.

A candlelight vigil and moment of silence were held today in the Agora to remember the 14 women who were killed 24 years ago at École Polytechnique de Montréal.

“Ending violence against women is not just a priority for women, women’s groups, or organizations such as our Gender Issues Centre,” said Lakehead President and Vice-Chancellor Dr. Brian Stevenson. “As a university, a community, and a society, it is the responsibility of us all to teach each other and our children that violence against others is wrong and it will not be tolerated. Today, we are reminded that while change has occurred, change is still required, and we cannot stop until such violence is eliminated.”

 

- 30 -

 

 

Media: To arrange an interview, please contact Brandon Walker, Media Relations Officer, at (807) 343-8177.

 


Lakehead University is a comprehensive university with a reputation for a multidisciplinary teaching approach that emphasizes collaborative learning and independent critical thinking. More than 8,700 students and 1,850 faculty and staff learn and work at campuses located in Orillia, and Thunder Bay, Ontario, which is home to the west campus of the Northern Ontario School of Medicine. Lakehead University promotes innovative research that supports local and regional socio-economic needs. In Orillia, development continues on building a campus that meets Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) standards
. For more information about Lakehead University, visit www.lakeheadu.ca.

Lakehead signs MOU with UAlberta’s Faculty of Arts School in Italy

December 5, 2013 ­­— Thunder Bay, ON

Lakehead University officials have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that establishes a relationship with the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Arts School in Cortona, Italy.

The Memorandum of Understanding creates a framework to allow: 

  • Mobility of faculty and/or staff
  • Mobility of graduate and/or undergraduate students
  • Joint research activities and publications
  • Participation in seminars and academic meetings
  • Exchange of academic materials and other information
  • Special short-term academic programs

“This initiative with the University of Alberta will forge stronger connections between our institutions and the Italian community,” said Lakehead University President and Vice-Chancellor Dr. Brian Stevenson. “Today’s MOU signing is a collaboration that will not only bridge generations of Italians in Thunder Bay and Orillia with their Italian roots, it will also allow non-Italians to experience the rich history and culture of Italy.”

Dr. Rod Hanley, Lakehead University’s Provost and Vice-President (Academic), explained how today’s signing represents another success in Lakehead’s efforts to create partnerships with other postsecondary institutions that benefit students, faculty and staff.

“This MOU fosters relationships with our Italian communities while extending Lakehead’s reach around the globe to bring the world to our students,” Dr. Hanley said.

Currently, students from all of the University of Alberta’s faculties and disciplines travel to Cortona, Italy each year to enrol in courses that take advantage of the country’s unique Tuscan region. University of Alberta professors conduct regular classroom lectures (in English) on diverse topics like Renaissance Art, Roman Civilization, Italian language and Political Science.

Dr. Carl G. Amrhein, Provost and Vice-President (Academic) at the University of Alberta, came to Thunder Bay for the signing. “I would like to recognize the local Italian community for their generosity in supporting students to study at the University of Alberta School in Cortona, Italy,” he said. “Not only will this agreement strengthen the connection between the University of Alberta and Lakehead University, but also between the cities of Edmonton and Thunder Bay.”

Instead of reading about Italian art in a textbook, students actually travel to see Michelangelo's David.  Instead of learning the Italian language in a classroom, students will live it.  Studying at the School in Cortona is more than just attending lectures - it's about being immersed in a relevant cultural experience.

Dean of the Faculty of Arts at the University of Alberta, Dr. Lesley Cormack, said, “The School in Cortona welcomes Lakehead University students. All our students benefit from the easy access to the cultural riches of Italy and the international and multidisciplinary perspectives that studying abroad affords. This agreement will now allow us to reach a wider audience of Canadian students to provide an experience that will resonate with them both academically and culturally.”

 

Institute of Italian Studies–Lakehead University Contributes $25,000

The Institute of Italian Studies-Lakehead University’s (IISLU) board of directors contributed $25,000 to the Cortona project through the Free Tuition scholarship program at Lakehead University. The funds will be used to send students to study in Cortona, Italy.

“To study the Italian language while being immersed in the culture of Italy is the ideal situation,” said IISLU’s President, Roy Piovesana, who believes Lakehead students will get a perspective on the study and understanding of Italian that they would never experience in Canada.

“For the Institute of Italian Studies, the encouragement of and financial support for the study of the Italian language and culture is central to the fulfillment of its mission and mandate,” Piovesana added.

Cortona Scholarship Recipients

Thanks to the IISLU’s contribution, approximately four Lakehead University students will have the opportunity to spend a month studying in Cortona, Italy.

The first Lakehead student to benefit from this collaboration between the IISLU, Lakehead University, and the University of Alberta, will be Jennifer Rankel, a third year Bachelor of Education student at Lakehead’s Orillia campus, who will spend January 2014 in Cortona.

In May 2014, Kelsey Pennanen and Paige Elizabeth Tyler, both second year students from Lakehead’s Thunder Bay campus, will also make the trip.

"I am so grateful to the Italian Society of Thunder Bay, Lakehead University, and the University of Alberta, for their generosity,” said Kelsey Pennanen, who is currently completing her Honours Bachelor of Science in Geoarchaeology. “I am so excited for the chance to study in Cortona, and how the experience and knowledge I will gain from this trip will broaden my understanding of the world and the amazing history it has to offer."

Paige Tyler is an Honours Bachelor of Science (Geography) and Bachelor of Education student who sees the opportunity to participate in the Cortona program as a dream come true. “I’m really looking forward to meeting lots of people, while learning about a new culture and language,” said Tyler. “Without this IISLU award, I would not have been able to take part in this life-changing opportunity.”

The application process for the international exchange scholarship to Cortona is the same as all Lakehead University exchange student initiatives.

 

Lakehead University President and Vice-Chancellor, Dr. Brian Stevenson (left) and University of Alberta Provost and Vice-President (Academic), Dr. Carl G. Amrhein.

Lakehead University & UAlberta MOU Signing

Lakehead University President and Vice-Chancellor, Dr. Brian Stevenson (left) and University of Alberta Provost and Vice-President (Academic), Dr. Carl G. Amrhein. 

Back row (left to right):  Cortona Scholarship Recipient, Kelsey Pennanen; IISLU President, Roy Piovesana; Lakehead University Provost and Vice-President (Academic), Dr. Rod Hanley; Lakehead University President and Vice-Chancellor, Dr. Brian Stevenson; IISLU Vice-President, John Bonofiglio; IISLU Secretary and Treasurer, Richard Buset; Cortona Scholarship Recipient, Paige Tyler. Front row (left to right):  Stelle Dancers, Jessica Falcioni and Jamie Pauluzzo-Thom

Cortona Scholarship Recipients & Officials

Back row (left to right):  Cortona Scholarship Recipient, Kelsey Pennanen; IISLU President, Roy Piovesana; Lakehead University Provost and Vice-President (Academic), Dr. Rod Hanley; Lakehead University President and Vice-Chancellor, Dr. Brian Stevenson; IISLU Vice-President, John Bonofiglio; IISLU Secretary and Treasurer, Richard Buset; Cortona Scholarship Recipient, Paige Tyler.

Front row (left to right):  Stelle Dancers, Jessica Falcioni and Jamie Pauluzzo-Thom

- 30 -

Lakehead University Media Contact:

Brandon Walker, Media Relations Officer

mediarelations@lakeheadu.ca, or (807) 343-8177

University of Alberta Media Contacts:

Jamie Hanlon, Communication and Media Associate

jamie.hanlon@ualberta.ca, or (780) 492-9214

Andrea Graham, Senior Officer (Communications), Faculty of Arts

andrea.graham@ualberta.ca, or (780) 492-9136


Lakehead University is a comprehensive university with a reputation for a multidisciplinary teaching approach that emphasizes collaborative learning and independent critical thinking. More than 8,700 students and 1,850 faculty and staff learn and work at campuses located in Orillia, and Thunder Bay, Ontario, which is home to the west campus of the Northern Ontario School of Medicine. Lakehead University promotes innovative research that supports local and regional socio-economic needs. In Orillia, development continues on building a campus that meets Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) standards
. For more information about Lakehead University, visit www.lakeheadu.ca.

The University of Alberta in Edmonton is one of Canada’s top teaching and research universities, with an international reputation for excellence across the humanities, sciences, creative arts, business, engineering, and health sciences. Home to more than 39,000 students and 15,000 faculty and staff, the university has an annual budget of $1.7 billion and attracts nearly $450 million in sponsored research revenue. The U of A offers close to 400 rigorous undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs in 18 faculties on five campuses—including one rural and one francophone campus. The university has almost 250,000 alumni worldwide. The university and its people remain dedicated to the promise made in 1908 by founding president Henry Marshall Tory that knowledge shall be used for “uplifting the whole people.”

 

Lakehead conference will explore the role of government policy in sustainable mining development

November 18, 2013 ­­— Thunder Bay, ON

Lakehead University’s recently established Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Mining and Exploration (CESME) will help address challenges faced by Northwestern Ontario’s mining sector at an upcoming conference that will feature several speakers, including Bob Rae.

The Role of Government Policy in Sustainable Mining Development conference will bring together researchers and participants from First Nation, Métis and other local communities, government, and industry on Thursday, Dec. 5 and Friday, Dec. 6, 2013 at Lakehead’s University Centre, Room 1015.

“We will discuss policies regarding infrastructure, Aboriginal and community engagement, environmental protection, workforce development, taxation and benefit-sharing, and business development,” said Dr. Peter Hollings, CESME Director.

“This conference will be of interest to anyone in the mining sector or anyone who is interested in the challenges faced by the mining sector. One of the challenges is pursuing sustainable economic development while ensuring environmental protection and respecting treaty rights,” Hollings said.

The conference, which will be moderated by Dr. Cynthia Wesley-Esquimaux, Lakehead’s Vice-Provost (Aboriginal Initiatives), will examine the past, present and future of public policy in the mining sector in various jurisdictions across Canada.

The past will be investigated through an examination of the development of the Voisey’s Bay nickel mine in Newfoundland and Labrador, as well as past experiences in Ontario.

The present will focus on the state of policy development for mineral development in northern Quebec and northern British Columbia.

The future will focus on visions for the future, including the Ring of Fire in Ontario. Participants will discuss recommendations to inform future policy development in mining in northern Ontario, particularly the Ring of Fire.

The conference will bring together leaders in mining policy and development from Canada and around the world, with a strong participation from First Nation, Métis and local community leaders, industry and government.

There will be a free public session at 7 pm on Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 at Lakehead’s Thunder Bay campus in University Centre 1017.

Speakers include:

 

  • Bob Rae, chief negotiator for Matawa First Nations Tribal Council in the Ring of Fire
  • Bill Gallagher, author of Resource Rulers
  • Steve Lindley from SNC Lavalin
  • Elsie MacDonald, Webequie First Nation
  • Ramsey Hart, MiningWatch Canada
  • Jason Aagenes, Cliffs Natural Resources

 

For further information, please visit http://cesme.lakeheadu.ca/ or contact Dr. Hollings via cesme@lakeheadu.ca or call 807-343-8329.

 

 

- 30 -

 

 

Media: To arrange an interview, please contact Brandon Walker, Media Relations Officer, at (807) 343-8177.

 


Lakehead University is a comprehensive university with a reputation for a multidisciplinary teaching approach that emphasizes collaborative learning and independent critical thinking. More than 8,700 students and 1,850 faculty and staff learn and work at campuses located in Orillia, and Thunder Bay, Ontario, which is home to the west campus of the Northern Ontario School of Medicine. Lakehead University promotes innovative research that supports local and regional socio-economic needs. In Orillia, development continues on building a campus that meets Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) standards
. For more information about Lakehead University, visit www.lakeheadu.ca.

Lakehead University’s Faculty of Law Signs Aboriginal Protocol Agreement

Lakehead University officials have signed a protocol agreement with Nishnawbe Aski Nation, the Union of Ontario Indians, Grand Council Treaty #3, and Métis Nation of Ontario to establish a strong, meaningful and respectful working relationship regarding the Faculty of Law.

November 27, 2013 – Thunder Bay, ON

Lakehead University officials have signed a protocol agreement with Nishnawbe Aski Nation, the Union of Ontario Indians, Grand Council Treaty #3, and Métis Nation of Ontario to establish a strong, meaningful and respectful working relationship regarding the Faculty of Law.

The agreement brings together these Aboriginal leaders who will meet on a semi-annual basis to discuss issues relating to Aboriginal perspectives of the law.

“I look forward to working with First Nation and the Métis Nation organizations in furthering the Faculty of Law’s mandate of focusing on Aboriginal law and understanding of Aboriginal issues, the needs of small practitioners, and natural resources law,” said Faculty of Law Founding Dean Lee Stuesser.

“This protocol agreement establishes a much-needed process for ongoing engagement with the Aboriginal community so priorities from our perspective are identified and understood,” said Nishnawbe Aski Nation Deputy Grand Chief Goyce Kakegamic.

“It is essential that the Faculty of Law remain engaged with First Nation and Métis political organizations to ensure that our perspectives on historical and emerging issues are reflected through the curriculum,” Deputy Grand Chief Kakegamic added.

“Lakehead University, with the new Law School and agreements with First Nations, has taken a positive step in creating a strong environment for our young men and women to be positive role models in the world of education,” said Union of Ontario Indians Regional Grand Chief Peter Collins. 

“Treaty #3 is known for the treaty promise of a shared learning through an education system that provides opportunities for all Anishinaabe to reach their goals,” said Grand Chief Warren White of Grand Council Treaty #3.

“The commitment to an ongoing relationship and a forum where Anishinaabe input into the study of Law through this Protocol agreement is of great value and will benefit those educated in the program and the communities and individuals they will one day work for,” Grand Chief White said.

“As an Aboriginal government in Ontario, the Métis Nation of Ontario (MNO) is excited to partner with Lakehead University and other Aboriginal governments through this protocol agreement,” said MNO President Gary Lipinski.

“Métis participation in the Faculty of Law at Lakehead will help address obstacles Aboriginal people face when pursuing postsecondary education, permit a focus on Métis law, attract more Métis to the legal profession and train lawyers who understand the needs of Aboriginal people and communities,” President Lipinski added. 

Lakehead President and Vice-Chancellor Dr. Brian Stevenson said this agreement is important because the Faculty of Law owes its existence to the commitment of communities in Northwestern Ontario.

“Nishnawbe Aski Nation was one of the groups that approached Lakehead University to create the Faculty of Law,” Dr. Stevenson said. “We value our partnerships and look forward to working with all of these groups to make the Faculty of Law the best it can be for this community and the region.”

Photo cutline: From left to right are Professor Lee Stuesser, Founding Dean of Lakehead University’s Faculty of Law; Lakehead President and Vice-Chancellor Dr. Brian Stevenson; Deputy Grand Chief Goyce Kakegamic, Nishnawbe Aski Nation; Chief Gary Allen from Treaty #3 (signing on behalf of Grand Chief Warren White); Regional Grand Chief Peter Collins from the Union of Ontario Indians; and President Gary Lipinski from Métis Nation of Ontario.

 

- 30 -

 

Media: To arrange an interview, please contact Brandon Walker, Media Relations Officer, at (807) 343-8177.

Lakehead University is a comprehensive university with a reputation for a multidisciplinary teaching approach that emphasizes collaborative learning and independent critical thinking. More than 8,700 students and 1,850 faculty and staff learn and work at campuses located in Orillia, and Thunder Bay, Ontario, which is home to the west campus of the Northern Ontario School of Medicine. Lakehead University promotes innovative research that supports local and regional socio-economic needs. In Orillia, development continues on building a campus that meets Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) standards. For more information about Lakehead University, visit www.lakeheadu.ca

County of Simcoe and Lakehead University further solidify partnership with $1M contribution and naming of building

Midhurst/November 26, 2013 – Lakehead University Orillia was presented a $1 million cheque by the County of Simcoe during County Council this morning in Midhurst, Ontario. This brings the total amount of contributions to Lakehead by the County of Simcoe to $3.5 million since 2009.

In recognition of the County’s ongoing, tremendous support, Lakehead University President & Vice-Chancellor, Dr. Brian Stevenson, also made a major announcement by proudly proclaiming that the University’s Academic Building would be named Simcoe Hall. An official ceremony will be held at the Orillia Campus in spring 2014.

“The County of Simcoe has been enormously supportive of our University community and our Orillia campus since its inception,” said Lakehead University President and Vice-Chancellor, Dr. Brian Stevenson, who thanked the County on behalf of the University community and Lakehead’s Board of Governors. “Without the County, Lakehead University would not be in Orillia, today.”

“County Council recognizes the important impact that our partnership and support for both Lakehead University Orillia and Georgian College has in shaping the future of Simcoe County,” said Warden Cal Patterson. “Council is committed to implementing our 10-year economic development and tourism strategic plan and investing in our communities for the greater good of our residents. Thank you for naming your building Simcoe Hall — it is a great honour and we look forward to the official ceremony next spring.”

Dr. Stevenson stated that the County’s generous gift would go towards the funding of this world-class campus and enhancing every student’s academic experience. 

The County of Simcoe makes $1 million contribution to Lakehead University Orillia during County Council. Left to right: Warden Cal Patterson; Dr. Brian Stevenson, President and Vice-Chancellor, Lakehead University; Dr. Kim Fedderson, Dean and Vice Provost, Orillia Campus; and Mr. Bruce Waite, Member of the Lakehead University Board of Governors.

The County of Simcoe makes $1 million contribution to Lakehead University Orillia during County Council. Left to right: Warden Cal Patterson; Dr. Brian Stevenson, President and Vice-Chancellor, Lakehead University; Dr. Kim Fedderson, Dean and Vice Provost, Orillia Campus; and Mr. Bruce Waite, Member of the Lakehead University Board of Governors.   

Artist's rendering depicting Lakehead Orillia's Academic Building as the University's new Simcoe Hall.


Artist's rendering depicting Lakehead Orillia's Academic Building as the University's new Simcoe Hall

The County of Simcoe is composed of sixteen member municipalities and provides crucial public services to County residents in addition to providing paramedic and social services to the separated cities of Barrie and Orillia. Visit our website at simcoe.ca

Lakehead University is a comprehensive university with a reputation for a multidisciplinary teaching approach that emphasizes collaborative learning and independent critical thinking. More than 8,700 students and 1,850 faculty and staff learn and work at campuses located in Orillia, and Thunder Bay, Ontario, which is home to the west campus of the Northern Ontario School of Medicine. Lakehead University promotes innovative research that supports local and regional socio-economic needs. In Orillia, development continues on building a campus that meets Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) standards. For more information about Lakehead University, visit www.lakeheadu.ca.

– 30 –

County of Simcoe:

Allan Greenwood
Director, Corporate Communications

705-726-9300 ext. 1230

Allan.Greenwood@simcoe.ca

Lakehead University

Kathy Hunt

Communications Officer

705-330-4008 ext. 2014

kjhunt3@lakeheadu.ca

Lakehead’s Faculty of Law Receives Approval for Canada’s First Integrated Practice Curriculum

November 22, 2013 ­­— Thunder Bay, ON

Lakehead University’s Faculty of Law has received approval from the Law Society of Upper Canada for its Integrated Practice Curriculum (IPC), the first in Canada to integrate legal professional training into a law degree.

The Faculty of Law’s model of legal education fuses the theory of law with the practice of law. In addition to learning law, students will also acquire the necessary practical skills to use the law effectively.

“Our curriculum is aimed at integrating legal skills with substantive legal knowledge,” said Professor Lee Stuesser, Founding Dean of Lakehead’s Faculty of Law. “Skills are taught progressively and coordinated so they build one upon the other – course by course, year by year.”

“We’re extremely pleased that there are new, innovative pathways providing licensing candidates with choices in fulfilling the licensing process,” says Law Society Treasurer Thomas G. Conway. “I want to commend Lakehead University on this groundbreaking initiative.”

Students enrolled in Lakehead’s Law Program will complete IPC training and placements within their three-year degree.

“Integrating legal skills into the Juris Doctor program is exactly what was proposed by the Carnegie Report into legal education in 2007,” Professor Stuesser explained. “It also mirrors the training and placements offered in other professional programs such as medicine, nursing and education.”

Incorporating IPC and placement into Lakehead’s Law degree program furthers the Faculty of Law’s mission of serving Northern Ontario and providing better access to justice in rural Canada. It will also prove beneficial for students in the program.

The focus of Lakehead’s Law Program is to have students graduate ‘practice ready’ for work in the North and main street Canada. This means that students need to be knowledgeable in Aboriginal law, resource law, and the realities of small firm practice.

“The Faculty of Law at Lakehead will take full advantage of the small class sizes by offering a meaningful experiential education to all of our students. Skills are taught at Lakehead in small classes using hands-on, face-to-face instruction,” said Dr. Rod Hanley, Lakehead University Provost and Vice-President (Academic).

Students will search for placements within Northern Ontario and smaller centres – areas where articling positions are not plentiful but the need for new lawyers is high.

Lakehead Law students will have 18 credit hours of instruction per semester, amounting to 108 credit hours over six semesters of study. A minimum of 90 credit hours is set by the Federation of Law Societies to earn a Law degree. Other Ontario Law programs require between 90 and 96 credit hours.

Lakehead’s IPC will not cost students additional fees or time. The existing tuition will include the IPC training and placement. Graduates of Lakehead’s Law program will not need to article or complete any other course of study.

For information about Lakehead’s IPC, click here: www.lakeheadu.ca/academics/departments/law/ipc

Lakehead University’s Faculty of Law is Ontario’s first new law school in 44 years, and welcomed its charter class of students in September 2013.

 

- 30 -

 

 

Media: For more information, please contact Brandon Walker, Media Relations Officer, at (807) 343-8177.

 

Lakehead University is a comprehensive university with a reputation for a multidisciplinary teaching approach that emphasizes collaborative learning and independent critical thinking. More than 8,700 students and 1,850 faculty and staff learn and work at campuses located in Orillia, and Thunder Bay, Ontario, which is home to the west campus of the Northern Ontario School of Medicine. Lakehead University promotes innovative research that supports local and regional socio-economic needs. In Orillia, development continues on building a campus that meets Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) standards. For more information about Lakehead University, visit www.lakeheadu.ca.

 

Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute and Lakehead University Scientist developing a new method for breast imaging

Dr. Alla Reznik with TBRRI, Hospital and Lakehead University representatives


(November 21, 2013 - Thunder Bay, ON)

Dr. Alla Reznik, an Associate Professor of Physics at Lakehead University and Senior Scientist with the Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute (TBRRI), is developing a new cancer imaging technique with financial support from the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation (CBCF).

The CBCF grant provides Dr. Reznik and her research team with $450,000 over three years to develop a Portable Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) device as a new method for breast imaging.
 
The PEM will be more effective for detecting tumours in younger women who generally have denser breast tissue.
 
“Mammography remains a primary tool to significantly reduce mortality from breast cancer. It is still the most efficient way to detect breast cancer in women over 50 years of age,” said Dr. Reznik, who was recently renewed as a Canada Research Chair in the Physics of Medical Imaging. “However, there is always room for improvement, especially in cases of younger high-risk women who have to be tested very often at early ages.”

Women with a family history of breast cancer are susceptible to an increased risk of development. Breast cancer in high-risk women is known to have early onset, and those women must be screened yearly at a substantially younger age than women who are at an average risk.
 
Current mammography uses compression between two plates and low dose X-rays to image the breast, showing the dense mass of a tumor in contrast to the breast tissue. However in dense breasts, this can make the image more difficult to interpret.

PEM, on the other hand, is a molecular breast imaging method that distinguishes between cancerous cells and normal cells using a radiotracer to highlight areas of abnormality. This allows for detection of small masses, regardless of the breast density, and doesn’t require compression of the breast.
 
“The work being done by Dr. Reznik and her research team is directly advancing one of TBRRI’s main strategic goals – achieving excellence in imaging with a focus on patient care,” said Dr. Roxanne Deslauriers, CEO, TBRRI, and VP Research, Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre (TBRHSC). “The financial support from the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation will go a long way to ensuring that this new and innovative imaging technique becomes a reality for patients in the Region – and perhaps someday, internationally.”

Dr. Rod Hanley, Lakehead University Provost and Vice-President (Academic), offered his congratulations to Dr. Reznik and her team.
 
“Dr. Reznik is one of Lakehead University’s shining stars – she is part of the reason we were ranked #1 in Ontario and #2 in Canada in research for universities of our size. Dr. Reznik’s innovation will save the lives of young women who can be more difficult to diagnose for breast cancer, and for that we are very proud,” said Dr. Hanley.
 
Sandra Palmaro, CEO of the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation – Ontario Region, echoed those sentiments and the benefits to patients.
 
“We are very proud to support Dr. Reznik’s innovative and promising work. We know that the sooner breast cancer is detected, the better the outcome for patients and this is especially true for young women at high risk where detection through traditional mammography can be challenging,” said Palmaro. “As the largest funder of breast cancer research in Canada, we are hopeful that by funding the best and brightest scientists across the country, like Dr. Reznik, we will create a future without breast cancer.”


* * * *

 
Photo Cutline: (from left to right): Dr. Mark Henderson, EVP, Patient Services, TBRHSC, Regional VP, Cancer Care Ontario; Dr. Roxanne Deslauriers, CEO, TBRRI, VP Research, TBRHSC; Dr. Alla Reznik, Senior Scientist, TBRRI, Associate Professor of Physics, Lakehead University, Canada Research Chair in the Physics of Medical Imaging; Dr. Rod Hanley, Provost and VP (Academic), Lakehead University, Director, TBRRI Board; Bonnie Tittaferrante, volunteer Run Director, CIBC Run for the Cure (representing the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation - Ontario Region)
 
 
 
                                                                             -30-
 
 
 
For more information, please contact:
 
Marcello Bernardo
Communications Officer
Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre
Tel. 807.684.6765
bernarma@tbh.net

 
Brandon Walker
Media Relations Officer
Lakehead University
Tel. 807.343.8177
bwalker3@lakeheadu.ca
 

About Lakehead University
 
Lakehead University is a comprehensive university with a reputation for a multidisciplinary teaching approach that emphasizes collaborative learning and independent critical thinking. More than 8,700 students and 1,850 faculty and staff learn and work at campuses located in Orillia, and Thunder Bay, Ontario, which is home to the west campus of the Northern Ontario School of Medicine. Lakehead University promotes innovative research that supports local and regional socio-economic needs. In Orillia, development continues on building a campus that meets Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) standards. For more information about Lakehead University, visit www.lakeheadu.ca
 

About the Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute
 
Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute (TBRRI) – an independent, not-for-profit corporation – is the research arm of the Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre. Our scientists work closely with clinicians, medical professionals, and academic and industry partners to improve healthcare through excellence in patient-centred research focused on three molecular imaging-based platforms. Research is advanced through discovery and development of new technologies and processes that are brought to patients through clinical trials. With successful trial validation, discoveries proceed to commercialization for the benefit of patients everywhere. For more information, visit www.tbrri.com
 


About the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation
 
Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation is the leading community-driven organization in Canada dedicated to creating a future without breast cancer. Our investments in innovative and relevant research and education have led to progress in breast cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment and care. Since 1986, we have been at the forefront of a nationwide movement supporting and advocating for the breast cancer community. Join us at www.cbcf.org

Pages