Summer/Fall 2019 Journey Magazine is here!

Here are some of the features in this issue:

HOBBITS AND STEGODONS

Image of 'hobbit'
Searching for the reasons behind the extinction of a race of 3.5-
feet-tall early humans

NOW AND THEN

Image of scuba divers in Lake Tamblyn
Kevin Ford reminisces about his Lakehead SCUBA exploits

HISTORY BUFF

Photo of Tom Rose
Tom Rose came back home to Orillia and discovered the lure of
the past

MONSTER MASH

Photo of Ryan McVeigh
Fear and fascination permeates our long-running obsession with
monsters

FISTS OF FURY

Photo of Emma Horner in a fight.
Don’t get on MMA fighter Emma Horner’s bad side

SULTAN OF SAMBA

Photo of Rick Lazar
Award-winning percussionist Rick Lazar is an innovator in the
vibrant world music scene


Please send your comments, suggestions, and story ideas to editor@lakeheadu.ca.

Amazing Race Canada challenge designed by Lakehead University

Photo of an Amazing Race Canada racer participating in a challenge with a headset covering his eyes.

An Amazing Race Canada racer participates in a challenge.

August 21, 2019 – Thunder Bay, Ont.

As you may have heard, Canada’s most-watched summer series, the multiple Canadian Screen Award-winning The Amazing Race Canada, filmed an episode in Thunder Bay.

However, what you may not know – since it was a well-kept secret – is that Lakehead University’s Faculty of Natural Resources Management helped create one of the challenges.

“When we were approached by the producers of The Amazing Race Canada, we suggested a great challenge that we use with our students – and the producers agreed that it would work,” said Dr. Ulf Runesson, Lakehead University’s Dean of Natural Resources Management. 

“We don’t want to say too much, because we shouldn’t spoil it, but our challenge went quite well,” Dr. Runesson said.

Hosted by Olympic Gold Medallist Jon Montgomery, tune in to next week’s episode of The Amazing Race Canada to watch the remaining racers push themselves outside of their comfort zones in this non-stop, action-packed season that started airing on July 2.

The Thunder Bay episode of The Amazing Race Canada aired on Tuesday, Aug. 27 on CTV, CTV.ca, and the CTV app.

Watch the episode here.

For information about Lakehead University, visit lakeheadu.ca/future-students/programs or take a tour: lakeheadu.ca/future-students/campus-tours

 

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Media: For more information or interviews, please contact Brandon Walker, Media, Communications and Marketing Associate, at (807) 343-8177 or mediarelations@lakeheadu.ca.

 

Lakehead University has approximately 9,700 full-time equivalent students and 2,000 faculty and staff in 10 faculties at two campuses in Orillia and Thunder Bay, Ontario. Lakehead is a fully comprehensive university: home to Ontario’s newest Faculty of Law in 44 years, the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, and faculties of Engineering, Business Administration, Health & Behavioural Sciences, Social Sciences & Humanities, Science & Environmental Studies, Natural Resources Management, Education, and Graduate Studies. Maclean’s 2019 University Rankings place Lakehead University among Canada's Top 10 primarily undergraduate universities and in 2018 Research Infosource named Lakehead Research University of the Year in its category for the fourth consecutive year. Visit www.lakeheadu.ca.

The Hobbit Apocalypse

What rats can tell us about the rise and fall of Homo floresiensis

by Tracey Skehan

For almost a million years, ‘hobbits’ lived on the Indonesian island of Flores.

These 3.5-foot-tall hominins – officially known as Homo floresiensis – thrived until about 50,000 years ago. Then, inexplicably, they disappeared without a trace.

Their existence only came to light in 2003 when a group of Indonesian-Australian researchers unearthed the skeleton of a female hobbit in a vast limestone cave called Liang Bua. The find was a major breakthrough in the evolutionary field.

Since the discovery, most anthropologists have been in consensus that hobbits went extinct when they vanished from Liang Bua 50,000 years ago. But now, Dr. Matt Tocheri, the co-leader of the Liang Bua excavations, and his team have uncovered evidence to the contrary.

 Dr. Tocheri says that Komodo dragons, giant marabou storks, and vultures were once large species common at Liang Bua. Like the hobbits, they were probably attracted by herds of stegodons grazing outside the cave. Stegodons – an extinct elephant approximately the size of a large cow – were the main food source for these scavengers.

“The hobbits probably waited until the Komodo dragons and the scavenging birds were done picking over the stegodon corpses and then they cracked open whatever bones were left and sucked out the marrow,” he explains.

Dr. Tocheri, who is also a Lakehead University associate professor and Canada Research Chair in Human Origins, initially went to Liang Bua as a hominin expert. “Early humans, though, tend to be rare,” he says, “which meant that a lot of the time I didn’t have much to do, so I started looking at everything else being excavated. I soon noticed that rat bones made up 85-90% of all the animal bones being recovered from the cave.”

He saw the rodents as a potential trove of information about Homo floresiensis and their environment. That’s why from 2009 to 2014, Dr. Tocheri measured the hip joints of over 10,000 rats while his graduate student, Grace Veatch, measured more than 1,000 elbow joints. Their research established that diverse rat species – ranging from mouse-sized to common rabbit-sized – inhabited the cave and its surrounding area but that the frequency of the different-sized rat species varied over time.

“A striking pattern emerged that gave us new insights about the kinds of habitats that surrounded the cave at various points through time.” During the age of the hobbits, the cave was dominated by a medium-sized rat called Komodomys. This species still survives today in grassland regions, however approximately 60,000 years ago at Liang Bua, it was replaced by smaller and larger rat species more common in forested areas.

“We realized from the rats that there was a dramatic environmental change at Liang Bua around 60,000 years ago – when habitats shifted from mostly grasslands to dense forest.” It’s likely that this drove the stegodons, which prefer more open habitats, to another part of the island with more hospitable terrain.

The hobbits and other scavengers probably followed them.

If that’s the case, there’s another intriguing mystery to solve. How much longer did the hobbits survive after leaving Liang Bua and why did they die out? “I consider it most likely that modern humans were responsible for the extinction of Homo floresiensis, however, we need more evidence to prove that,” Dr. Tocheri says.

“Modern humans show up in Australia around 60,000 years ago,” he notes. To get there, they had to travel across the many Indonesian islands that lie between the Asian and Australian continents. “Despite this, the earliest evidence of modern humans within the Indonesian archipelago only dates to 40,000-45,000 years ago,” says Dr. Tocheri. “Yet, the hobbits and stegodons disappeared around that time – it’s suspicious. A lot of our work at Liang Bua is focused on refining the timeline and seeing if we can find evidence of modern humans arriving a little bit earlier.”

Even if modern humans never directly interacted with the hobbits, their behaviours could easily have led to their extinction. “Modern humans could have done enough damage to stegodon herds within one or two seasons after arriving on the island to cause the stegodon population to crash and quickly go extinct.”

In this bleak scenario, once the primary animal the hobbits had relied upon to survive for a million years was gone, their fate was sealed.

Times Higher Education ranks Lakehead University among world’s top universities

September 13, 2019 – Thunder Bay and Orillia, Ont.

Lakehead University has been included in the top half of the Times Higher Education’s list of top universities from around the world.

The 2019 Times Higher Education World University Rankings has Lakehead University in the 601-800 category out of nearly 1,400 universities from 92 countries.

“This is a significant achievement for Lakehead University,” said Dr. Moira McPherson, Lakehead’s President and Vice-Chancellor. “While helping acknowledge and promote Lakehead’s status among the world’s top universities, these rankings acknowledge our University’s ongoing drive and commitment to delivering high quality programs, fostering excellence in research, scholarly and creative work, and providing a unique and transformative learning experience that positions our graduates for success.”

Lakehead University is in the same section of the rankings as other, larger Canadian universities, such as Concordia, Québec, Regina, Sherbrooke, Ryerson and Windsor. This is the first time Lakehead University has participated in the rankings. Not all universities that take part in the rankings are ranked.

Lakehead University’s placement is above the worldwide median in three of the five categories: Research, Citations, and International Outlook.

“Our strong global performance in the Research category reflects Lakehead’s advancement in research and continued recognition as the number one research university in Canada in the primarily undergraduate category, a designation we have been awarded for four consecutive years,” said Dr. Andrew Dean, Vice-President, Research and Innovation.

In terms of Lakehead’s position in the International Outlook category, James Aldridge, Vice-Provost, International, explained that, “This is a testament to the efforts we’ve made to develop global perspectives through ongoing internationalization of Lakehead University, as well as the growth of our international student body.”

“In 2019, Lakehead is the university of choice for over 1,400 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 75 countries,” added Aldridge.

The Times Higher Education World University Rankings judges research-intensive universities across each one of their core missions: teaching (the learning environment); research (volume, income and reputation), international outlook (staff, students and research); citations (research influence); industry income (knowledge transfer).

It uses 13 carefully calibrated performance indicators to provide the most comprehensive and balanced comparisons, and all data is independently audited by professional services firm PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), making the World University Rankings the only global university rankings to be subjected to full, independent scrutiny of this nature.

 

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Media: For more information or interviews, please contact Brandon Walker, Communications and Marketing Associate, at (807) 343-8177 or mediarelations@lakeheadu.ca.

 

Lakehead University has approximately 9,700 full-time equivalent students and 2,000 faculty and staff in 10 faculties at two campuses in Orillia and Thunder Bay, Ontario. Lakehead is a fully comprehensive university: home to Ontario’s newest Faculty of Law in 44 years, the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, and faculties of Engineering, Business Administration, Health & Behavioural Sciences, Social Sciences & Humanities, Science & Environmental Studies, Natural Resources Management, Education, and Graduate Studies. In 2018, Research Infosource named Lakehead Research University of the Year in its category for the fourth consecutive year, and Maclean’s 2019 University Rankings place Lakehead University among Canada's Top 10 primarily undergraduate universities and found that students ranked Lakehead University as one of the top 10 universities in Canada and top three universities in Ontario that prepare them for employment. Visit www.lakeheadu.ca.

Monsters Teach Us about Ourselves

by Brandon Walker

Professor Ryan McVeigh believes we can learn a lot about the world by studying monsters.

As an assistant professor in Sociology and Interdisciplinary Studies at Lakehead Orillia, Dr. McVeigh understands how life connects people in various ways, which is why monsters fascinate him.

“Since people are so deeply connected to each other, it’s interesting that they hurt other people, which is why I also started to study violence,” he says.

“Because monsters in some sense permit or promote you directing violence towards them, I started to wonder what the sociological significance of monsters was.”

Dr. McVeigh says civilizations from all recorded periods of history have some semblance of a monstrous “other.” In myth, legend, and folklore, all cultures feature creatures that those societies do not allow to belong.

“These excluded ‘others’ are characterized as evil outsiders that we are supposed to stay away from. They do violence to us and we are allowed to do violence to them, so there’s historical significance to studying monsters, but I’m interested more in the sociological significance.”

The sociological significance hinges upon how the presence of monsters changes the way we act compared to the way we normally act around people who are more like us.

“An easy way to think about this is to pretend there’s a zombie apocalypse. What happens to the everyday norms of society – the rules and regulations we abide by?”

“You pack up your car and your kids, everyone is ready, you’re going to flee, you need to get out of the neighbourhood, and – oh, you come to a red light. Are you going to stop at the red light? Probably not,” Dr. McVeigh says. Those regulations and rules “get tossed out the window,” Dr. McVeigh says, much like prescriptions against violence.”

“Violence is not something people are normally allowed to do,” he says. “But if a zombie walked into your office, what would you do?”

“You would probably ignore the law and do your best to kill it. If you have ever seen the show the Walking

Dead, you know there’s no question. If you’re faced with a zombie, there’s no, ‘Hmmm, is it morally okay?’ In fact, you are morally responsible to attack a zombie. They invite that violence.”

Dr. McVeigh defines monsters as humans and non-humans who society does not allow to belong because they disrupt the separation between particular categories.

“A werewolf is monstrous because it calls into question the category of wolf and the category of person. A zombie breaches the line between life and death – now there is something both dead and alive.”

Brandon asked Dr. McVeigh if the following fictional characters are monsters:

 

Walter White from Breaking Bad

Ruling: Monster.

He is a disruption of category. It’s interesting to watch Walt become the character that he has created for himself. This tough guy pose that he adopts, he leans in and doubles down to become Heisenberg. He’s for sure a monster by the end, so he has to die – it was the only ending that made sense.

 

The Wicked Witch of the West from the Wizard of Oz

Ruling: Monster.

Even her portrayal was designed to be seen as monstrous due to her bright green skin, plus she surrounded herself with flying monkeys – not normally the company you want to keep.

 

Maleficent from Sleeping Beauty

Ruling: Monster.

She was a stepmother. Step or otherwise, as a mother you’re culturally expected to care for your children, and she turns into a dragon at the end – in case there was any doubt.

 

Edward Scissorhands

Ruling: Monster.

Others see him as a monster but he really struggles to be accepted and belong. One of the defining traits of monsters is that they are not allowed to belong even though sometimes they want to. You empathize with him trying not to appear as a monster. He looks monstrous but you want to give him another chance.

Public lecture series brings scholars together to talk about the fragility of democracy

September 9, 2019 – Orillia, ON

The global political landscape has showcased the inherent fragility of democracy, but does that mean democracy is dying?

Political experts and scholars will come together in Third Age Learning Lakehead’s (TALL) fall lecture series, Is Democracy Dying?, to explore the struggles and threats that are transforming our democracies and the solutions we can employ to make democracy more meaningful.

Presentations will include:

  • Why do Democracies Fail? Lessons from Interwar Germany – Dr. Valerie Hébert, Associate Professor, History and Interdisciplinary Studies, Lakehead University.
  • Can We Make Good Political Decisions? – Dr. David Moscrop, political theorist, a SSHRC postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Communication at the University of Ottawa, and a columnist for the Washington Post.
  • Teardown: Imaging a New Democracy? – Dave Meslin, activist, organizer and author. His TED talk about apathy has more than 1.7 million views and his video clip from the 2016 Canadian election coverage, using stacks of Lego bricks, has over 2.5 million views on Facebook.
  • The Struggle for Canadian Democracy: The Politics of Voting System Reform Today – Dr. Dennis Pilon, Associate Professor in the Department of Politics at York University. He is Canada’s leading expert on the issue of voting system reform and the author of two books on the topic.
  • The Alt-Right’s Threat to Democracy (And What We Can Do to Counter it) – Dr. Tanner Mirrlees, Associate Professor in the Communication and Digital Media Studies program at Ontario Tech University, the vice president of the Canadian Communication Association, and a steering committee member for The Centre on Hate, Bias and Extremism.

The TALL five-part lecture series runs every Wednesday from September 18 to October 16 from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at St. Paul’s Centre in Orillia. There is a registration fee of $59 (plus HST) per person. For more information, or to purchase tickets, head to lakeheadu.ca/tal.  

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Media contact: Jaclyn Bucik, Media, Communications and Marketing AssociateLakehead Universityjbucik@lakeheadu.ca or 705-330-4008, ext. 2014.

 Lakehead University has approximately 9,700 full-time equivalent students and 2,000 faculty and staff in 10 faculties at two campuses in Orillia and Thunder Bay, Ontario. Lakehead is a fully comprehensive university: home to Ontario’s newest Faculty of Law in 44 years, the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, and faculties of Engineering, Business Administration, Health & Behavioural Sciences, Social Sciences & Humanities, Science & Environmental Studies, Natural Resources Management, Education, and Graduate Studies. Maclean’s 2019 University Rankings place Lakehead University among Canada's Top 10 primarily undergraduate universities and in 2018 Research Infosource named Lakehead Research University of the Year in its category for the fourth consecutive year. Visit www.lakeheadu.ca.

The five speakers featured in Third Age Learning Lakehead's fall lecture series Is Democracy Dying?

Living Well With Dementia Conference Will Inspire Hope

September 5, 2019 – Thunder Bay, Ont.

Are you experiencing memory loss? Have you received a diagnosis of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease? If so, then you and your care partner should register for the two-day Living Well With Dementia: Creating Dialogues of Hope conference.

The conference will start on Sunday, Sept. 22 with a special Dementia Café: A Place to Belong, at the Urban Abbey from 2 to 4 pm, followed by a barbecue at the Best Western Plus Nor'Wester Hotel.

Then on Monday, Sept. 23, the conference will be at the Nor'Wester Hotel starting at 9:30 am when keynote speaker Roger Marple from Alberta will discuss his experiences of finding hope and living well with dementia.

There will be a variety of sessions throughout the two days, including challenging the stigma of dementia, physical activity and cognitive health, sharing stories about hope, and planning ahead. The North West Dementia Working Group, in collaboration with Lakehead University's Centre for Education and Research on Aging & Health (CERAH), is delighted to be hosting this conference.

Susan Bithrey, a member of the North West Dementia Working Group said this conference will be beneficial for people who have experienced dementia.

"I am honoured to be involved with the North West Dementia Working Group, and especially to be able to contribute to the upcoming conference," Bithrey said.

"As a former care partner to my late husband Reg during his ten-year journey with dementia, I gained insight into how challenging it is to live well with this disease, and to care for someone as they go about their daily lives. I hope to be able to share some of my and Reg's lived experience, and in doing so, perhaps be able to help others in their
journeys."

"This conference will bring together people with dementia and their care partners across the region to connect and share their experiences of challenging the stigma associated with dementia and living with hope amidst dementia," said Dr. Nisha Sutherland, a Research Associate with CERAH and co-facilitator of the North West Dementia Working Group.

For those living in Northwestern Ontario outside of Thunder Bay, travel and accommodation subsidies are available. A $25 registration fee includes all workshop materials and refreshments over the two days.

For further information, please visit cerah.lakeheadu.ca/events, or contact Ruth Wilford at (807) 766-7298.

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Media: For more information or interviews, please contact Brandon Walker, Media, Communications and Marketing Associate, at (807) 343-8177 or mediarelations@lakeheadu.ca .

Lakehead University has approximately 9,700 full-time equivalent students and 2,000 faculty and staff in 10 faculties at two campuses in Orillia and Thunder Bay, Ontario. Lakehead is a fully comprehensive university: home to Ontario's newest
Faculty of Law in 44 years, the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, and faculties of Engineering, Business Administration, Health & Behavioural Sciences, Social Sciences & Humanities, Science & Environmental Studies, Natural Resources Management, Education, and Graduate Studies. Maclean's 2019 University Rankings place Lakehead University among Canada's Top 10 primarily undergraduate universities and in 2018 Research Infosource named Lakehead Research University of the Year in its category for the fourth consecutive year.

Lakehead University receiving $742k to support seven important research projects

August 29, 2019 – Thunder Bay, Ont.

Lakehead University researchers are receiving more than $742,000 from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) for seven important projects undertaken by faculty and graduate students.

Three projects in particular will assist Indigenous children who are experiencing mental health difficulties, investigate how food sovereignty can provide health interventions in Northern Ontario's rural and urban hubs, and assist people with dementia in the decision-making surrounding their own death.

The project between Lakehead University and a local First Nations children's services organization aims to use a variety of strategies to develop treatments for young Indigenous children who are experiencing mental health difficulties.

"The approach that we'll be using brings together the best of what we know from a psychological approach, but also the best of what we know from traditional cultural approaches. Bringing together these knowledge bases helps improve the wellness of young people," said Dr. Christopher Mushquash, an associate professor in Lakehead's Department of Psychology and the Northern Ontario School of Medicine.

A grant of $160,000 from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research will be used to develop a group intervention strategy for First Nations children and youth.

Dr. Mushquash, who holds the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Mental Health and Addiction, is also the director of the Centre for Rural and Northern Health Research and a psychologist at Dilico. Dr. Mushquash is also the Associate Vice-President, Research at Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre and Chief Scientist at the Thunder Bay Regional Health Research Institute.

"Dilico's role in this project is to meet the clinical needs of the service population in a way that honours our strengths as a people," said John Dixon, director of mental health and addiction services at Dilico Anishinabek Family Care, whose offices are located on the Fort William First Nation.

Along with Dr. Mushquash and Dixon, the research team includes PhD student Kristy Kowatch, as well as Tina Bobinski and Kristine Stasiuk of Dilico.

Dr. Mushquash, who grew up in Sioux Lookout, has been working with First Nations organizations on improving the lives of people in remote communities. Along with a high level of poverty, residents are also struggling with the lingering effects of the 60s Scoop and the residential school system.

"When you bring these elements together it creates a much higher need for mental health services," Dr. Mushquash said, referring to issues such as depression, anxiety, emotion regulation, adjustment to trauma and substance use.

The treatment participants will be clients of Dilico, ages 7-12. Often they present with multiple diagnoses, such as depression as well as anxiety and difficulty sleeping.

Partnerships with Dr. Mushquash have been community-focused and community-driven, Dixon said.

"Research is only undertaken if it is wanted by the community and is of benefit to communities in terms of immediate knowledge translation, and the advancement of community wellness," he said.

"What we will do on the psychology side of things," Dr. Mushquash explained, "is bring together the very best literature and approaches on what we think could be of utility to young people."

That information will go to an advisory group of stakeholders and community members for feedback. At the same time, Dilico will engage people with expertise in addressing these symptoms to build a program for children that will hopefully decrease depression, anxiety, and other mental health concerns.

"It is our expectation that training and service delivery models will be developed from this work that will further enhance Indigenous models of care," Dixon said, emphasizing the focus is on Anishinabek beliefs, spirituality and community relations.

Dr. Lana Ray, assistant professor in Indigenous Learning, is receiving $142,211 to spend one year creating an Indigenous Food Sovereignty (IFS) best practice framework that she will use to design, implement and evaluate health interventions for Indigenous peoples accessing services in Northern Ontario's urban and rural communities.

"At a community level, this project will examine the effectiveness of moving from an outcome based approach to one that is focused on the ways in which health is negotiated and lived among Indigenous peoples according to an Indigenous model of health, and thus an understanding of health that is culturally based," Dr. Ray said.

Through a case-study design and engagement with health care providers and administrators throughout the region, Dr. Ray and the project team are able to build upon the innovative work currently happening at partner Aboriginal Health Access Centres in northern Ontario.

Dr. Ray will work with Joe LeBlanc, Director of Indigenous Affiars at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, and co-investigators Anita Cameron, Perry McLeod-Shabogesic, Dr. Kristin Burnett, associate professor in Indigenous Learning, and Dr. Barbara Parker, assistant professor in Sociology.

Dr. Nisha Sutherland, assistant professor in the School of Nursing and research affiliate at the Centre for Education and Research on Aging & Health, is receiving $195,075 to spend three years exploring and promoting end-of-life decision-making for people with dementia living in long-term care homes.

"The purpose of this study is to include residents with dementia and their care partners (paid care workers and unpaid family members) when making decisions about dying," Dr. Sutherland wrote in her funding application. "We will use methods of interview, observation and review of documents to understand how care decisions are made for residents with dementia."

This study is important to point to new ways of including residents with dementia and the people who care for them in making decisions towards palliative care.

First, they will use a relational model of citizenship to understand the meaning of actions and intentions of people with dementia and include them in decision-making. Second, they will use a critical feminist lens to highlight the influence of gender and other social relations in end-of-life decision-making.

"We will partner with long-term care home partners and people with dementia in the community to create a video that sheds light on fair practices and policies," Dr. Sutherland wrote.

This study is essential for residents with dementia to have a fair chance to receive quality palliative care and die in the way they wish. This project was ranked first out of 18 in its category. "Thank you to the CIHR for recognizing the important research undertaken by Lakehead University faculty and graduate students," said Dr. Andrew Dean, Lakehead University's Vice-President, Research and Innovation.

Funding from CIHR also generates support from the federal Research Support Fund to offset the indirect costs of research incurred by universities.

In 2018/19, Lakehead University will receive nearly $2 million in assistance from the Research Support Fund to support the indirect costs of research, which includes costs for supporting the management of intellectual property, research and administration, ethics and regulatory compliance, research resources, and research facilities.

New CIHR Grants 2018-19: Total $742,286

Faculty Member Grants

Project Grant (three- to four-year grants)

Dr. Christopher Mushquash, Department of Psychology, Developing a transdiagnostic group intervention for First Nations children and youth, $160,000.

Principal Applicant – Knowledge User

John Dixon, Dilico Anishinabek Family Care

Co-applicant – TraineeKristy Kowatch, Department of Psychology

Collaborators - Knowledge Users

  • Tina Bobinski, Dilico Anishinabek Family Care
  • Kristine Stasiuk, Dilico Anishinabek Family Care

Dr. Nisha Sutherland, Department of Nursing, Promoting Just and Inclusive End-of-life Decision-making for Long-term Care Home Residents with Dementia and their Care Partners, $195,075.

Co-applicants

  • Dr. Mariette Brennan, Bora Laskin Faculty of Law
  • Dr. Sherry Dupuis, University of Waterloo
  • Dr. Pia C. Kontos, University Health Network (Toronto)
  • Dr. Oona M. St-Amant Ryerson University
  • Dr. Elaine C. Wiersma, Department of Health Sciences, Director, Centre for Education and Research on Aging & Health

Catalyst Grant: Indigenous Approaches to Wellness Research (One year grant)

Dr. Lana Ray, Department of Indigenous Learning, Investigating Food Sovereignty as a Best Practice Framework for Health Interventions in Rural and Urban Hubs in Northern Ontario, $142,211.

Principal Knowledge User

  • Joe LeBlanc, Director of Indigenous Affairs at NOSM
     

Co-applicants

  • Dr. Kristin Burnett, Department of Indigenous Learning
  • Dr. Barbara Parker, Department of Sociology

Knowledge Users

  • Perry McLeod-Shabogesic, Shkagamik-Kwe Health Centre
  • Anita Cameron, Waasegiizhig Nanaadawe'iyewigamig

Partner

  • Sudbury Social Planning Council

Graduate Student Grants

CIHR – Doctoral Research Award – Priority Announcement: Research in First Nations, Métis and/or Inuit Health Award

Kowatch, Kristy - Clinical Psychology – The development, implementation and evaluation of a transdiagnostic group intervention for First Nations children. September 1, 2018 – August 31, 2021, $105,000.

CIHR – Doctoral Award – Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholarships (CGS-D) Award

Toombs, Elaine – Clinical Psychology – The Strongest FamiliesTM Parenting Program: A randomized-controlled trial of a culturally appropriate parenting program for northwestern Ontario First Nations communities. September 1, 2018 – August 31, 2021, $105,000.

CIHR – Canada Graduate Scholarships-Master's Program

Kristen Chafe - Clinical Psychology, The Role of Estrogen in Moderating the Relationship Between Lifestyle Factors and Cognitive Ability in Older Women May 1, 2018 – April 31, 2018, $17,500.

CIHR – Canada Graduate Scholarships-Master's Program

Martina Agostino – Biology, Novel Methods for the Treatment and Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia. September 1 – August 31, 2019, $17,500.

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Media: For more information or interviews, please contact Brandon Walker, Communications and Marketing Associate, at (807) 343-8177 or mediarelations@lakeheadu.ca.

Lakehead University has approximately 9,700 full-time equivalent students and 2,000 faculty and staff in 10 faculties at two campuses in Orillia and Thunder Bay, Ontario. Lakehead is a fully comprehensive university: home to Ontario's newest Faculty of Law in 44 years, the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, and faculties of Engineering, Business Administration, Health & Behavioural Sciences, Social Sciences & Humanities, Science & Environmental Studies, Natural Resources Management, Education, and Graduate Studies. Maclean's 2019 University Rankings place Lakehead University among Canada's Top 10 primarily undergraduate universities and in 2018 Research Infosource named Lakehead Research University of the Year in its category for the fourth consecutive year. Visit www.lakeheadu.ca.

Headshot of the researchers in this project

Lakehead University’s Superior Science receiving $60k for coding program

Photo of a Superior Science camper using a Makey Makey external circuit board connected to a laptop.

A Superior Science camper uses a Makey Makey external circuit board connected to a laptop.

August 16, 2019 – Thunder Bay, Ont.

Lakehead University’s Superior Science is receiving $60,000 from Actua to continue developing and enhancing the CanCode program, which teaches young people about coding.

With the initial round of CanCode funding from 2017, Superior Science purchased various new pieces of technology including 3D printers, Ozobots (coding robots), and Makey Makeys (external circuitry boards).

With this new equipment, Superior Science was able to offer more coding initiatives to provide youth with access to technology-based education.

“We also were able to do more outreach to schools both locally and in remote communities in Northwestern Ontario where youth would otherwise not have access to this technology,” said Ashley Andrea, Superior Science Director.

Superior Science also ran its first ever Code Club last year, which was a huge success. Children were able to come to Lakehead University on Saturdays throughout the school year to learn how to code and use the equipment to see how it applies to their daily lives.

“We are so excited that the CanCode initiative was renewed again this year and we can’t wait to develop and enhance our program even more,” Andrea said.

“With this new round of CanCode funding, we are happy that – due to the success of our first Code Club – we will be running the same program again this year at no charge,” said Michael Coccimiglio, Superior Science Director.

Superior Science also plans to continue expanding the scope of technology they offer campers as they move forward with new equipment and applications surrounding science and engineering. Finally, Superior Science is also hoping to do more outreach than ever before to both local schools and northern communities and reserves.

“Superior Science is excited to have a share of this CanCode funding to support activities that introduce children to coding,” said Dr. Mary Louise Hill, a Geology professor at Lakehead University who is Superior Science’s faculty advisor.

“Our first camp was in the summer of 1999, and this is our 20th anniversary of getting kids excited about STEM on Lakehead's campus.”

Actua is a national charity that is preparing youth to be innovators and leaders by engaging them in exciting and accessible STEM experiences that build critical skills and confidence.

 

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Media: For more information or interviews, please contact Brandon Walker, Communications and Marketing Associate, at (807) 343-8177 or mediarelations@lakeheadu.ca.

 

Lakehead University has approximately 9,700 full-time equivalent students and 2,000 faculty and staff in 10 faculties at two campuses in Orillia and Thunder Bay, Ontario. Lakehead is a fully comprehensive university: home to Ontario’s newest Faculty of Law in 44 years, the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, and faculties of Engineering, Business Administration, Health & Behavioural Sciences, Social Sciences & Humanities, Science & Environmental Studies, Natural Resources Management, Education, and Graduate Studies. Maclean’s 2019 University Rankings place Lakehead University among Canada's Top 10 primarily undergraduate universities and in 2018 Research Infosource named Lakehead Research University of the Year in its category for the fourth consecutive year. Visit www.lakeheadu.ca.

student uses laptop

Lakehead University announces new Dean of Law

August 27, 2019 – Thunder Bay, Ont.

Lakehead University's Interim Provost & Vice-President (Academic), Dr. David Barnett, is pleased to announce that Dr. Jula Hughes has been named as the Bora Laskin Faculty of Law's new Dean.

Dr. Hughes is currently a professor at the Faculty of Law of New Brunswick and will begin at Lakehead University on October 1, 2019.

Dr. Hughes holds a prestigious two-year appointment as University Research Scholar and is the principal investigator on a SSHRC and Status of Women Canada funded research and community action collaboration titled "Looking out for each other," a capacity-building project by, with and for Indigenous communities and Aboriginal organizations that supports families and friends of missing persons.

Prior to her appointment at the University of New Brunswick, she practiced labour and human rights law in Ottawa.

Lakehead University's Bora Laskin Faculty of Law is a regional law school with a focus on Northern Ontario. It embraces three mandates in its curriculum: Aboriginal and Indigenous Law, Natural Resources and Environmental Law, and Sole/Small Town Practice with the Integrated Practice Curriculum.

"Jula's experience makes her a perfect fit with the faculty's three mandates," Dr. Barnett said, adding that he would like to thank the members of the Search Committee and everyone who participated and supported the search, within Lakehead and from the external community.

Dr. Hughes said she is excited to join the Bora Laskin Faculty of Law.

"Reconciliation with First Peoples and access to justice are key challenges for our legal system, for the legal profession and for legal education in Canada," she said.

"I am excited to join the Bora Laskin Faculty of Law as Dean and to lead and contribute to a faculty with a mandate to learn from Indigenous legal traditions and to promote equitable and honourable relationships between Indigenous Peoples and settlers.

"Access to justice is an important determinant of a peaceful and prosperous society. Through the Integrated Practice Curriculum, the Bora Laskin Faculty of Law is educating lawyers in the North, for the North. I see huge promise in the approach Lakehead University has taken to the issue of access to justice. We can make a big difference," she added.

The search process for Lakehead's newest Dean of Law began in 2018. The Search Committee was comprised of representatives from the Bora Laskin Faculty of Law, other Lakehead University Faculties; the University's various governing bodies, the Thunder Bay Law Association, Anishinabek Nation, Anishinawbe Omaa Minowaywin (the advisory committee at the Bora Laskin Faculty of Law), Fort William First Nation, Grand Council Treaty 3, the Métis Nation of Ontario, Nishnawbe Aski Nation, and Lakehead University's Ogimaawin-Aboriginal Governance Council.

Dr. Jula Hughes

Dr. Hughes is a full professor at the Faculty of Law at the University of New Brunswick. She currently holds a prestigious two-year appointment as University Research Scholar and is the principal investigator on a SSHRC and Status of Women Canada funded research and community action collaboration titled "Looking out for each other," a capacity-building project by, with and for Indigenous communities and Aboriginal organizations that supports families and friends of missing persons.

She is the author of 24 peer-reviewed publications, and she has participated in numerous international and national conferences as invited speaker, convener, presenter, panel organizer and discussant.

Dr. Hughes was appointed as Assistant Professor in 2006, promoted to Associate Professor in 2011, tenured in 2012 and promoted to Professor in 2017. Prior to her appointment at UNB, she practiced labour and human rights law in Ottawa. In 1999- 2000, she clerked for Justice Ian Binnie of the Supreme Court of Canada.

A recipient of UNB Law's Teaching Excellence award in 2016, she currently teaches Criminal Law, Constitutional Law and Jurisprudence. In the past, she has also taught Foundations, Public Law, Labour Law, Labour Arbitration, Human Rights Law, Wrongful Convictions and Advanced Criminal Procedure. She is the chair of the Law Faculty Experiential Learning and TRC committees and has participated in and/or chaired a wide variety of faculty committees.

Dr. Hughes has served the university community as elected senator-at-large and member of the Research Ethics Board. She served as president and chief negotiator of the faculty association (for which she was awarded the CAUT Dedicated Service Award). Her contributions to faculty labour relations included membership in the task force on mandatory retirement and the renegotiation of UNB's shared pension plan.

Her contributions to the legal community include serving as regional coordinator and senior advocacy advisor of the Supreme Court Advocacy Institute, vice-president of the Fredericton Legal Advice Clinic, and corporate secretary of the Canadian Association for Legal Ethics. She was co-chair of a provincial inquiry into New Brunswick's legal aid system. Further, she is a frequent contributor to judicial and continuing legal education conferences and the chair of the RCMP national advisory committee on witness protection. She is the co-editor-in-chief of the Canadian Journal of Law and Society and she was a member of the executive and grant adjudication committees of the Urban Aboriginal Knowledge Network (Atlantic), SSHRC adjudicator and frequent peer reviewer.

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Media: For more information or interviews, please contact Brandon Walker, Communications and Marketing Associate, at (807) 343-8177 or mediarelations@lakeheadu.ca.

Photo of Dr. Jula Hughes by Rob Blanchard, UNB

Lakehead University has approximately 9,700 full-time equivalent students and 2,000 faculty and staff in 10 faculties at two campuses in Orillia and Thunder Bay, Ontario. Lakehead is a fully comprehensive university: home to Ontario's newest Faculty of Law in 44 years, the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, and faculties of Engineering, Business Administration, Health & Behavioural Sciences, Social Sciences & Humanities, Science & Environmental Studies, Natural Resources Management, Education, and Graduate Studies. Maclean's 2019 University Rankings place Lakehead University among Canada's Top 10 primarily undergraduate universities and in 2018 Research Infosource named Lakehead Research University of the Year in its category for the fourth consecutive year. Visit www.lakeheadu.ca.

Headshot of Dr. Jula Hughes by Rob Blanchard

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