English Student Conference 2019

THE THIRD ANNUAL ENGLISH STUDENT CONFERENCE

Department of English, Lakehead University

We invite all undergraduate and graduate students of English on both campuses to participate in the English Student Conference, held on April 8th, 2019. Students will present 7–8 page papers focused on all aspects of English studies, including some of the following:

  • Literary texts
  • Films and television
  • Graphic novels and comics
  • New media (i.e. webcomics, instagram, blogs, etc.)
  • Visual texts
  • Cultural texts (i.e. architecture, fandom, ideas of “nature,” etc.)

Presentations:  9:00–4:30 in ATAC 5041 and OA2020 (Telepresence rooms)

 Lunch and refreshments will be provided

Post-conference Reception:     Orillia – Alumni Lounge  

                                                 Thunder Bay – The Study (back room)     

ALL WELCOME!

English 2018 Fall Newsletter

Check out the link to our English 2018 Fall Newsletter.

Learn about English events and news that have taken place since spring 2018. These activities involved faculty, graduate and undergraduate students. 

Stay connected; visit us on Facebook

Checkout the English Student Association (ESA) on Facebook  

English 2018 Spring Newsletter

Check out the link to our English 2017 Winter Newsletter.

Learn about English events and news that took place in 2017/2018. These activities involved faculty, graduate and undergraduate students. Also read the letter from ESA president, Summer course offerings; our featured "Reflections" article - and much more.

Stay connected; visit us on Facebook

Checkout the English Student Association (ESA) on Facebook  

Dr. Cheryl Lousley, Department of English and Interdisciplinary Studies named Fulbright research chair

Dr. Lousley’s research will focus on the study of contemporary Canadian novels and short stories, looking at the ways in which environmental concerns have been narrated in Canadian fiction. Her interest in memory aims to shift the focus away from future environmental concerns that tend to dominate to look at how our environmental histories tend to be forgotten.

“We talk about a number of great losses and sacrifices made in the development of our country, such as during war, but environmental losses, such as from polluted waterways, mining and climate change, do not tend to have the same profile and public memory,” said Dr. Lousley. “We always think that environmental problems are going to come in the future and that contributes to us carrying on in denial of climate change.”

In particular, she hopes her research will unveil the ways that different Canadian contemporary writers have been intervening in the narrative of Canada by the way in which they talk about our environmental past – writing stories back in so that way we can remember the ecological suffering that also happened during the development of our nation.

Fulbright Canada, the Foundation for Educational Exchange between Canada and the United States of America, is a binational, treaty-based, non-governmental, not-for-profit organization that encourages mutual understanding between Canada and the United States of America by providing academic and cultural opportunities.

 

Call for Papers

We invite all undergraduate and graduate students of English on both campuses to submit proposals for 7-8 page papers on any topic related to English studies.  Submissions should include a title and proposal describing your paper (max 300 words).

Email submissions to mflegel@lakeheadu.ca by Friday March 2, 2018. You can download full CFP details or contact the Department of English at engl@lakeheadu.ca for an e-copy.

Spring/Summer 2018 course offerings

                                  Spring Course offerings - May 1 - June 12

Course Code           Title    /   Description                                                Lecturer

English 1015 SDE -  Introduction to Academic Writing                               Cindy Soldan

An introduction to university-level standards of composition, revision, editing, research, and documentation. A review of English grammar (word and sentence level) and rhetorical forms (paragraph level and beyond), and a study of the methods and conventions of academic argumentation and research, with an emphasis on finding and evaluating sources, formulating research questions, developing arguments, and composing various types of analyses including academic essays.

Note:  Students who have previous credit in English 1011, 1031, or 1500 may not take English 1015 for credit.

ENGL/WOME 2810 SDE -  Gender, Sexuality and the Body in                Leslie Clement                                                         Literature and Culture        

An introduction to the role cultural texts play in constructions and understandings of gender, sexuality and the body and their historical and cultural variations. Topics to be covered may include diverse feminisms, masculinity, femininity, biology, queer studies, trans politics, and reproductive politics. These topics will be illuminated through a variety of cultural and theoretical texts.

Prerequisite(s) One FCE in English at the first-year level, or Women’s Studies 1100, or second-year standing, or permission of the Chair of the Department of English

Notes:  Women's Studies Group 1 course

English 3052 SDE -  Special Topics in Global and Minority Literatures:   Linda Rodenburg                                           New Zealand Literature                                      

This course focuses on the literatures and cultures of New Zealand, drawing on the writings of both Mãori and Pãkehã to discuss the postcolonial politics of identity. Reading works form a variety of genres and historical periods, students will engage critically with stories as they relate to identity and power relations.

Prerequisite(s) Two FCEs in English, including at least one half-course at the second-year level, or permission of the Chair of the Department
Note: English 3052 counts toward fulfillment of the Area 3 requirement.

                                Summer Course offerings July 3 - August 14

Course Code           Title    /   Description                                               Lecturer

English 1015 ADE -  Introduction to Academic Writing                               Cindy Soldan

An introduction to university-level standards of composition, revision, editing, research, and documentation. A review of English grammar (word and sentence level) and rhetorical forms (paragraph level and beyond), and a study of the methods and conventions of academic argumentation and research, with an emphasis on finding and evaluating sources, formulating research questions, developing arguments, and composing various types of analyses including academic essays.

Note:  Students who have previous credit in English 1011, 1031, or 1500 may not take English 1015 for credit.

English 2916 ADE -  Popular Fiction                                                          Holly Morgan

A study of popular texts. The role played by aesthetics in the evaluation of texts, as well as the relationship between “the popular” and “the literary,” and between "high" and "low" genres will be covered. Texts may include best-sellers, genre fiction, pulp fiction, romance, and television.

Prerequisite(s)One FCE in English at the first-year level or second-year standing, or permission of the Chair of the Department

Note: Students who have previous credit in English 3916 may not take English 2916 for credit.

English 3911 ADE -  Special Topics: History of English                            Rhonda Dubec

This course provides a chronological study of the history of the English language from its Indo-European roots to the present. We move from the prehistory of English, through Old English (before 1100), Middle English (12th-15th c.) and Early Modern English (16th—18th c.), to Modern English 18th c. to present) and World Englishes. Considering the social and political factors affecting language change, we examine the change in sounds (phonology), in forms of words and endings (morphology), in sentence structure (syntax), in spelling (orthography), in meanings of words (semantics), and in vocabulary (lexicon). We end with a consideration of the global hegemony of English and the rise of world Englishes, looking forward to what “English” might be like in 100 years.

Prerequisite(s): Two FCEs in English, including at least one half-course at the second-year level, or permission of the Chair of the Department

 

 

Pathways: A "Life Writing" course

The Department of English, Dr. Scott Pound, and in cooperation with Hospice Northwest, offered a "Life Writing" course for 3rd/4th year students.  This course provided students a unique opportunity to connect with Seniors in the community.  Seniors would tell their life story and students would put those words into written form.  At the end of the course, students gave the Senior the copy of the written work.  Of course students were graded on the work, but for most, the greatest reward was connecting with and learning from the Senior.  For more on this story including interviews from some students visit: http://pathways.lakeheadu.ca/#scott.

 

 

Unboxing the Marvel Comics controversy - Episode 1

Professors Monica Flegel and Judith Leggatt and 4th year English student McKenna Boeckner launch YouTube video series discussing issues raised such as the audiences for comics and the relationship between quality and diversity in the All-New, All Different line-up.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NNUxKKF5VnU&

Special thanks to the Office of the Dean of Social Sciences and Humanities at Lakehead University. McKenna's work was funded by an undergraduate summer research internship program.
Thanks also to Dr. Max Haiven, Canada Research Chair in Culture, Media and Social Justice, and the ReImagining Value Action Lab. Check out the great work being done.

 

 

Latasha Schaller, Graduate of the English MA program, publishes first novel

The Department of English congratulates Latasha Schaller on the publication of her novel, Trapped,  published with Iguana Press and available on June 15th.

Trapped presents "the story of a woman on the brink of a life-altering event, struggling to manage her anxiety in a situation that is becoming increasingly impossible." Through this work, Schaller helps raise awareness of the experience of living with anxiety and depression. Her novel was successfully crowd-funded to cover publication costs and will be available at laschaller.com.

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