Canadian Multiculturalism Day (in-person celebration)

Event Date: 
Monday, June 27, 2022 - 10:00am to 1:00pm EDT
Event Location: 
International Student Lounge (Ground floor of the Paterson Library)
Event Contact Name: 
Bella Lan
Event Contact E-mail: 

Hi, Thunderwolves!⁠

We hope you are enjoying our beautiful summer weather!⁠

We would like to invite you to the Canadian Multiculturalism Celebration on Monday, June 27. ⁠

You can register by scanning the QR code on the poster. For those of you who are not in Thunder Bay, we really would love it if you join us online. ⁠

Canadian Multiculturalism Celebration features 3 parts:⁠

1. Online Multicultural Video Competition
Video contest and rules:⁠
Video duration: Maximum 5 minutes⁠
This video must be an “original” work of art in relation to one’s food and culture of your choice.⁠
To join this contest, you just need a simple set of equipment, like your mobile phone, to film a short 5-minute video.⁠
Must include a brief introduction about yourself and the culture you are sharing in the video.⁠
You can participate and submit the video as an individual or as a group.⁠
You are automatically entered into a draw to win prizes when you submit the videos.⁠
Deadline to submit: Thursday, Jun 23, 2022, by 11:59 pm ET⁠
Email your video submissions to studentlife.intl@lakeheadu.ca


2. Canadian Multiculturalism Day (Online Celebration)
Date: 27 June 2022
Time: 10 - 11:00 am (ET)
Register here: https://lakeheadu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEuc-2rrjsqH9eFCzfsIJJxOi_c4...
Lakehead International invites you to join us online to learn about different cultures from around the world through a panel discussion and a fun Kahoot game.
Date: Monday, June 27, 2022
Time: 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm ET
Winner’s prize: The winner of the Kahoot game will receive an amazing $50 gift basket featuring Lakehead University swag and goodies.


3. Canadian Multiculturalism Day (in-person celebration)
Date: June 27, 2022
Time: 10 am - 12 pm
Location: International Student Lounge (Ground floor of the Paterson Library)
Join us in person for a fun afternoon as we celebrate multiculturalism and diversity with performances, food, music and crafts from different cultures.
Register here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSc07EuHDuy4ZDYiITTW3gzlI2ldUxI2...

The Association for Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies Conference

Event Date: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2022 - 9:00am to 10:30am EDT
Event Location: 
via Zoom
Event Contact Name: 
Cindy Haggerty
Event Contact E-mail: 


ACLALS public events (all times Eastern)

Link: https://ryerson.zoom.us/j/94129881816

Co-sponsored by Lakehead University, St. Jerome’s University, St. Mary’s University University of
British Columbia, University of New Brunswick, University of Toronto, and Toronto Metropolitan
University

Tues. July 12
9:00am-10:30am keynote by Ruth Vanita (U Montana), “Animals Today: Torn Apart in Life and in Death”

In the context of the almost unimaginable scale on which humans now inflict suffering on animals, this presentation revisits debates in the Sanskrit epics on the dharma of minimizing suffering. In today’s globalized economy, huge numbers of animals are bred merely to be tortured and killed for food, clothing and experimentation. More than 150 billion are killed for food alone each year. For these beings, life and death are an unbroken series of ruptures.

While thinkers like Shelley, Thoreau and Gandhi considered violence against animals inseparable from violence against humans, many others still formulate ideas of justice purely in terms of humans, ignoring animal suffering. In the epics, many characters, male and female, rich and poor, from supposedly low and supposedly high varnas, discuss how to minimize violence, assuming that eradicating it is impossible. I suggest that the dharma of kindness to animals is the dharma most available to all, without neither justice nor peace is possible.

The Association for Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies Conference

Event Date: 
Wednesday, July 13, 2022 - 9:00am to 10:30am EDT
Event Location: 
via Zoom
Event Contact Name: 
Cynthia Haggerty
Event Contact E-mail: 

ACLALS public events (all times Eastern)

Link: https://ryerson.zoom.us/j/94129881816

Co-sponsored by Lakehead University, St. Jerome’s University, St. Mary’s University
University of British Columbia, University of New Brunswick, University of Toronto, and Toronto Metropolitan University

Wed. July 13, 2022
9:00am-10:30am keynote by Susie O’Brien (McMaster U), “‘Somehow, a City’”: Unsettling Urban Resilience Narratives” (TRS 1-067)
This paper explores the theme of the ruptured commons as it plays out in the imagination of Toronto as a resilient city. After considering the ways in which Toronto’s First Resilience Strategy (developed in 2019 as part of the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities Project), mobilizes myths of nature, community and diversity towards a vision of settler colonial urban futurity, I will consider the alternate visions of urban futurity presented in David Chariandy’s 2017 novel Brother and Leanna Betasamosake Simpson’s short story, “Big Water.” These stories, I suggest, challenge dominant definitions of both social-ecological and psycho-social resilience, offering in their place modes of collective thriving based on multispecies relationality, decolonial resistance and creative imagination.

The Association for Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies Conference

Event Date: 
Friday, July 15, 2022 - 3:30pm to 5:30pm EDT
Event Location: 
via Zoom
Event Contact Name: 
Cynthia Haggerty
Event Contact E-mail: 

ACLALS public events (all times Eastern)

Link: https://ryerson.zoom.us/j/94129881816

Co-sponsored by Lakehead University, St. Jerome’s University, St. Mary’s University
University of British Columbia, University of New Brunswick, University of Toronto, and Toronto Metropolitan University

Friday July 15, 2022
3:30pm-5:30 pm

Keynote by Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm (U Toronto), “Present Tense: Ruptures, Disruptions/ReGeneration and Reconciling the Books”
Over the past year the recovery of the corpses of thousands of Indigenous children at the sites of “Indian Residential Schools” shocked Canadians, who quickly moved on, while Indigenous people have continued experiencing collective grief, trauma, and outrage, leaving us struggling to navigate the fraught and dangerous spaces of an imagin/ed/ary “commons” that not only excludes us, but has been the site of purposeful systemic violence and erasure. In this “commons” our presence is a source of constant tension. Although Indigenous inclusion is a necessary step in “reconciliation,” we remain Other, symbolic, a constant reminder of the lies of colonial capitalism, and, often, targets. As one of few Indigenous faculty, I am perceived by some as disruptive and, if not difficult and/or deficient, then at the very least, an annoyance disrupting an imagined future that did not include contending with me and all that I represent to colonial society: depressing histories better ignored, fault that is a burden to carry, threats to status quo comfort and stability. So, what does “commons” mean when Indigenous presence provokes and divides, resulting in some people lashing out, thereby ensuring that such spaces remain dangerous and fraught? What if we relocate, re-envision, and reGenerate this space not merely to include Indigenous peoples, but to ensure we retain our position at the centre?

Closing ceremony by Elder Joanne Dallaire (Toronto Metropolitan U)

The Association for Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies Conference

Event Date: 
Thursday, July 14, 2022 - 9:00am to 10:30am EDT
Event Location: 
via Zoom
Event Contact Name: 
Cynthia Haggerty
Event Contact E-mail: 

ACLALS public events (all times Eastern)

Link: https://ryerson.zoom.us/j/94129881816

Co-sponsored by Lakehead University, St. Jerome’s University, St. Mary’s University
University of British Columbia, University of New Brunswick, University of Toronto, and Toronto Metropolitan University

Thurs. July 14, 2022
9:00am-10:30am keynote by Cajetan Iheka (Yale U), “Uncommon Ruptures”
The colonial logic underpinning the commonwealth and the literatures that the term enframes effaced multiplicity for the rule of the singular, for the uncommon common. And when it comes to the commons, the shared features of space that made it inhabitable, colonialism and its neocolonial manifestations engendered destruction, but more importantly activated the hyper-separation of humans from nonhuman beings, therefore eroding the fundamental principle of ecological relationality. In this lecture, I describe colonialism’s instantiation of a violent common in its erasure of heterogeneity, and the rupture of the human-nonhuman bind that undergirds indigenous societies from Africa to the Americas to Asia, resulting in ecological trauma. I then use the writer Aminatta Forna’s latest novel Happiness to illustrate how decolonial artists have sought to revise a monolithic common for a pluriverse of difference while reinstating the commonality between humans and nonhumans that the colonial process ruptured.

The Association for Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies Conference

Event Date: 
Monday, July 11, 2022 - 10:00am to 12:00pm EDT
Event Location: 
via Zoom
Event Contact Name: 
Cynthia Haggerty
Event Contact E-mail: 

ACLALS public events (all times Eastern)

Link: https://ryerson.zoom.us/j/94129881816

Co-sponsored by Lakehead University, St. Jerome’s University, St. Mary’s University University of
British Columbia, University of New Brunswick, University of Toronto, and Toronto Metropolitan
University

Mon. July 11

10am-12pm Opening ceremony by Elder Joanne Dallaire (Toronto Metropolitan U)

Keynote Address by Lillian Allen (OCAD U), “Ah Soh Wi Sey: A people’s poetics blazing through to
the heart of what matters”

The ‘commons’ for some has always felt like something we were allowed but had no ownership in; immigrants, visitors, charity cases, the serviced, the accommodated. Even in the area of language, cultural forms and genres we found ourselves othered. I’ll discuss a poetics as exemplified by the spoken word and dub poetry movements which seized upon the inherent sovereignty of voice (already paid for at the moment of creation) and over the last couple decades created a sparkling new emerging and expanding commons to champion the voice of young people and misfits, to hold these voices as community and to engage with each other, society, and the world. My keynote will be a hybrid presentation utilizing pre-language and post language aesthetic in a poetic romp that will demand both a listening of intellect and body.

Tipi Raising Gathering

Event Date: 
Saturday, June 18, 2022 - 5:30am to 12:00pm EDT
Event Location: 
Lakehead University Orillia - 500 University Ave., Orillia, Ontario.
Event Contact Name: 
Mercedes Jacko
Event Contact E-mail: 

You are invited to....TIPI RAISING GATHERING

In honour of National Indigenous Peoples Day

Date: Saturday, June 18, 2022
Time: 5 AM - 12 PM
Location: Lakehead University Orillia 500 University Ave., Orillia, Ontario.

Agenda
5:32 AM: Sunrise Ceremony with Elder Trish Monague
8 AM - 12 PM: Crafting, Wampum Teaching, Drumming Teaching, and more!
9:30 AM - 12 PM: Tipi Teachings and Tipi Raising with Elder Jimmy Dick

ALL ARE WELCOME. PLEASE BRING A LAWN CHAIR. LIGHT REFRESHMENTS WILL BE PROVIDED!

If you have any questions, please contact Mercedes Jacko, Indigenous Initiatives Coordinator at Lakehead University, by phone. T: 705-330-4010 ext. 2018.

MSc Chemistry Thesis Proposal presentation

Event Date: 
Thursday, July 7, 2022 - 10:00am to 11:30am EDT
Event Location: 
AT2021
Event Contact Name: 
Chemistry
Event Contact E-mail: 

MSc Thesis Proposal presentation entitled: Design and Synthesis of Novel Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor-Targeting Small Molecules as Positron Emission Tomography Tracers

 
Author:  Austin Hopkins


Design and Synthesis of Novel Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor-Targeting Small Molecules as Positron Emission Tomography Tracers In recent years, medicine has advanced to a level where we can often diagnose some forms of cancer early in their development. However, this is not enough. In 2022, cancer is still one of the leading causes of death worldwide. One of the most common ways in which cancer is diagnosed is through using a medical imaging technique called positron emission tomography (PET), which often uses a glucose analogue called 18F-FDG to locate cancerous cells. However, using 18F-FDG is not always reliable and may give false results since it is consumed by all cells within the body. This leaves room for the development of a new PET molecule (PET tracer) that is more specific for cancerous cells, which would result in more accurate results. There is a family of proteins in humans that is known as the 'lysophosphatidic acid receptor', or LPAR, family; this family has six protein subtypes called LPA1 -LPA6 . The LPA1 subtype has a high expression level in several cancers, such as liver cancer and breast cancer. As such, the development of a new PET tracer that is specific for LPA1 would have extensive clinical benefits. My research is focused on the development of a novel PET tracer that targets LPA1 , which I plan to do in three steps. Firstly, I will use organic chemistry to synthesize a library of new molecules that have similar, yet novel, chemical structures to other LPA1 -specific molecules that have been reported in scientific literature. Once they have been synthesized, I will then use biological studies, including the Ca 2+ flux and cAMP assays, to determine important parameters such as their potencies. The molecule with the best results will then be chosen to be radiolabeled with fluorine-18, and this tracer can be evaluated in mouse models.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://lakeheadu.zoom.us/j/93667330964?pwd=UnlqdllWSXJkaFBkM3ZHK0kzem91...
Meeting ID: 936 6733 0964
Passcode: 382858

CERAH Speaker Series 2022 - The Pandemic Grief Pivot: In Search of Grief Ritual Alternatives

Event Date: 
Wednesday, June 8, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm EDT
Event Location: 
via zoom
Event Contact Name: 
Deb Riddell
Event Contact E-mail: 

This presentation features work from an MSW student project and seeks to shed light on the ways in which we have practiced individual and collective grief in recent times, ultimately offering a useful repository of grief ritual alternatives.

Please visit our website for more information and to register for this event.
https://cerah.lakeheadu.ca/events/cerah-speaker-series-the-pandemic-grie...

Biology MSc Thesis Defence - Ashley Faulkner

Event Date: 
Friday, June 17, 2022 - 11:00am to 12:00pm EDT
Event Location: 
Zoom
Event Contact Name: 
Heather Suslyk
Event Contact E-mail: 

Title: "Evaluation of Anti-E6 Single Domain Antibodies for the Treatment of Human Papillomavirus-related Cancer"

Supervisory Committee:
Dr. Ingeborg Zehbe (Supervisor)
Dr. Kam Leung
Dr. Marina Ulanova
Dr. Jinqiang Hou (External)

All are welcome to attend. Please contact biology@lakeheadu.ca for meeting ID and password.

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