Physics MSc Thesis Defense (Zoom Event) - presented by D. Michael Frood

Event Date: 
Monday, May 4, 2020 - 3:00pm
Event Location: 
Zoom Event
Event Contact Name: 
Dr. Apichart Linhananta
Event Contact E-mail: 

Department of Physics invites you to attend a Master of Science Thesis Defense
(Zoom event) Presented by:

D. Michael Frood

"Simulated Accelerated Evolution by Modeling the Rapid Fixation of Bacteria
Along an Antibiotic Gradient"

 
Supervisor: Dr. A. Linhananta
Committee members: Dr. M. Gallagher, Dr. G. Das
External Examiner: Dr. James Polson (Physics, University of Prince Edward Island)
 
 
Zoom Event:
Monday, May 4, 2020 at 3:00 pm
 (official start time of the defense will be 3:15 pm)
(for Join Zoom Link, Login & Password email contact as listed)
 
Contact:
Apichart Linhananta
 
 
 
 
 

PHYSICS Honours Thesis Presentations by PHYS 4501 students - A. Boon, H. Harris, P. Zebarth - Zoom Event

Event Date: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2020 - 1:30pm
Event Location: 
Zoom Meeting
Event Contact Name: 
Dr. Mark Gallagher/Dr. H. de Guise/Dr. A. Linhananta
 
The Department of Physics
Zoom Event for Honours Thesis Presentations (Phys 4501 YA)
presented by:
 
ARI BOON
"Patterns of many-photon Hong-Ou-Mandel dips”

HUNTER HARRIS
"Biophysics Model of the Evolution of Bacteria Resistance to Antibiotics”

PAUL ZEBARTH
"Investigation of Organic Molecules on Gold Surfaces"

Zoom Event:
Tuesday, April 7th
at 1:30 pm
(for Zoom link, login and password email contacts as listed)
 

Department of Physics - Research Seminar presented by Dr. O. Semeniuk, Candidate for LU-TBRHRI Research Chair in Biophysics

Event Date: 
Friday, July 27, 2018 - 1:00pm
Event Location: 
ATAC 2020
Event Contact Name: 
Dr. Apichart Linhananta
Event Contact Phone: 
(807) 343-8016
Event Contact E-mail: 

The Department of Physics invites you to attend a Research Seminar by LU-TBRHRI Research Chair in Biophysics candidate:

DR. OLEKSII SEMENIUK
Postdoctoral Researcher
Medical Physics Department of Nova Scotia Health Authority

"Advanced photoconductors for radiation medical
imaging detectors"

Friday, July 27, 2018
at 1:00 p.m. in AT2020

Abstract:

Solid state X-ray detectors play an essential role in a variety of applications, ranging from domestic security and astronomy to nuclear research and medical imaging. While the radiation sensing technology has made significant progress over the last decade, the “heart” of the detector (i.e. radiation sensing medium) has experienced only modest changes. Indeed, commercially available large area direct and indirect-conversion detectors are traditionally based on layers of amorphous selenium (a-Se) and cesium iodide (CsI), respectively. Nowadays, the performance of these materials has probably reached its full potential, despite the critical need for further improvement in terms of X-ray dose used and image quality. This is of particular importance for diagnostic medical imaging where performance of medical imaging devices defines the ability to detect and diagnose medical conditions accurately and at the earliest stage of disease. The goal of my work is to develop and characterize the next generation of customized X-ray photoconductors to address these issues. My talk will be focused on the most promising novel materials, namely amorphous lead oxide (a-PbO) and cesium lead bromide (CsPbBr3) which uniquely allow to reduce the dose associated with X-ray imaging, while improving the diagnostic capabilities and lowering detector costs.

Bio:

Dr. Oleksii Semeniuk is working as a postdoctoral researcher at the Medical Physics department of Nova Scotia Health Authority. The topic of his current research is development and characterization of a real-time monitoring system for cranial stereotactic radiosurgery. Oleksii completed his MSc and PhD at Lakehead University and his undergraduate at National Aviation University, Ukraine. His research interests lie in the area of radiation dose reduction for medical imaging applications. Particular, Oleksii is working on performance optimization of advanced X-ray photoconductors for utilization as X-ray-to-charge transducers in direct conversion detectors for fluoroscopy and general radiography.

Department of Physics Thesis Defense presented by Alex Clésio Nunes Martins

Event Date: 
Friday, September 14, 2018 - 1:30pm
Event Location: 
CB 4058
Event Contact Name: 
Dr. G. Das
Event Contact E-mail: 

Lakehead University logo

The Department of Physics invites you to attend a
thesis defense presented by:

ALEX CLESIO NUNES MARTINS
entitled

"Correspondence Rules in SU(3)"

Friday, September 14, 2018
1:30 p.m. in CB 4058

 

Department of Physics Seminar presented by Dr. M. Hawton / Dr. V. Debierre entitled "Maxwell Quantum Mechanics"

Event Date: 
Friday, October 26, 2018 - 3:30pm
Event Location: 
CB 4058
Event Contact Name: 
Physics Department
Event Contact Phone: 
(807) 343-8461

 Lakehead University logo
The Department of Physics
invites you to attend a seminar presented by:

Dr. Margaret Hawton
Professor Emeritus, Physics Dept., LU

Dr. Vincent Debierre
Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg

entitled:
  "Maxwell Quantum Mechanics"

Friday, October 26, 2018
 at 3:30 pm
in CB 4058

Department of Physics seminar presented by Dr. Werden J. Keeler entitled "High Performance Double-Confocal Micro-Raman System and Applications"

Event Date: 
Friday, November 9, 2018 - 3:30pm
Event Location: 
CB 4058
Event Contact Phone: 
807-343-8461
Event Contact E-mail: 

Lakehead University logo
The Department of Physics invites you to attend
a seminar presented by:

DR. WERDEN J. KEELER
Professor Emeritus, Physics Dept., LU

entitled:

"High Performance Double-Confocal Micro-Raman System and Applications"

Friday, November 9, 2018  
at 3:30 pm in CB 4058

Abstract:  This is a report on the development of a high-brightness confocal micro-Raman system assembled from components found in most optics labs or readily available from various suppliers.  An assembly approach can reduce system cost significantly if the major components are already at hand.

Further, we show how a second confocal pinhole and two in-line Rayleigh rejection filters can improve overall signal-to-noise and low wavenumber signal recovery, with only minimal reduction in throughput to the detector.

Finally, we demonstrate the system performance using a series of `straight-forward' and `more challenging' sample types.

PHYSICS 4501 YA - Honours Thesis Presentation by: T. Thibault

Event Date: 
Tuesday, August 27, 2019 - 2:00pm
Event Location: 
ATAC 1005
Event Contact Name: 
Dr. Alla Reznik
Event Contact E-mail: 

The Department of Physics Invites You To Attend An Honours Thesis Presentation By: 

TRISTEN THIBAULT
Characterization of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) Photoconductor for Applications in Spectral Computed Tomography (CT)

Supervisor: Dr. A. Reznik 

Abstract: Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is currently the only single-crystalline photoconductor used in the direct conversion gamma-cameras due to its high sensitivity to x-rays and gamma-rays, good transport properties, high intrinsic energy resolution, wide band gap and mature technology. Currently, CZT-based single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) gamma cameras are successfully used in oncology and cardiology where they demonstrate superior diagnostic capabilities, not achievable with indirect conversion SPECT technology. The high-energy resolution of CZT is also very promising for other spectroscopic applications including the emerging field of spectral Computed Tomography (CT). However, high flux operation rate typical in CT imaging puts stringent requirements on the detector performance and, most importantly, on the electron and hole drift mobilities.  This research project aims to provide the detailed analysis of charge transport properties of CZT detectors provided by Redlen Technologies using time-of-flight (TOF) technique. Detailed measurements of electron and hole mobilities under varying applied electric fields and pulse intensities have been performed to ensure the desired performance at high flux applications. The effect of photogeneration rates on charge transport must be further analyzed with temperature controlled TOF experiments and x-ray characterization to understand the underlying mechanisms at play.

Tuesday, AUGUST 27, 2019  2:00 pm in ATAC 1005

Department of Physics Research Proposal Presentation by J. Stiles

Event Date: 
Thursday, August 22, 2019 - 1:00pm
Event Location: 
AT1005
Event Contact Name: 
Dr. A. Reznik
Event Contact E-mail: 

 

The Department of Physics invites you to attend a research proposal presentation by: 

JUSTIN STILES
"Evaluation of Solid-State Technology for Positron Emission Mammography Imaging"

Supervisor: Dr. A. Reznik 

Abstract: To address unmet patient needs in breast cancer screening and conform with the trends of personalized medicine, we designed and developed an organ specific Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system called Positron Emission Mammography (PEM). The developed PEM detector technology is based on novel high-gain solid-state Silicon Photo-multipliers (SiPMs) operating in Geiger-mode. The goal of this research is to characterize the performance of our newly developed PEM detectors by conducting a series of standardized tests that are aligned with the recommendations of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) guidelines. Reporting the values for Loss, Count Rate, Sensitivity, and Spatial Resolution of Si-PM’s in this configuration will be the final goal of this work.

Thursday, AUGUST 22, 2019 
1:00 pm in ATAC 1005

Department of Physics Research Proposal Presentations by N. Kaur and D. Marchese

Event Date: 
Thursday, August 15, 2019 - 2:00pm
Event Location: 
CB 3031
Event Contact Name: 
Dr. G. Das and Dr. M. Gallagher

The Department of Physics invites you to attend research proposal presentations by: 

NAVNEET KAUR
"Raman Probe for the Detection of Chemicals"

Supervisor: Dr. G. Das 

ABSTRACT: A fiber-based Nanoprobe has been prepared for the detection of chemicals at the molecular level using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). We deposited gold nanorods on the surface of a multimode tapered fiber via optical tweezing to obtain the SERS substrate. The process of optical tweezing can be used to trap and manipulate the distribution of the metallic particles. We will present the theoretical and experimental results of our investigations.

 Thursday, August 15th
2:00 pm in CB 3031

 

DAVIDE MARCHESE

"Adsorption of 2-D Halogenated Organic Molecules on the Si(111)-B(√3x√3) R30o Surface"

Supervisor: Dr. M. Gallagher

Abstract: This project seeks to investigate the self-organization of two-dimensional halogenated organic  molecules on the (111) surface of boron doped silicon. In particular, the research goal is to determine if Si(111)-B(√3x√3) R30owill support the surface-confined self-organization of halogenated monomers into organized networks. The self-assembly and subsequent two-dimensional polymerization will be investigated. The primary experimental technique will be scanning tunneling microscopy. However, other surface techniques such as low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy may also be employed.

Thursday, August 15th
 3:00 p.m. in CB 3031

PHYS 4113 FA Student Poster Presentations

Event Date: 
Friday, November 30, 2018 - 9:30am
Event Location: 
LI 5002
Event Contact Name: 
Dr. H. de Guise
Event Contact E-mail: 

The Department of Physics invites you to attend
STUDENT POSTER PRESENTATIONS:

Hunter Harris and Ari Boon
“The bouncing ball”

David Ricci and Tristen Thibault
“The restricted 3-body problem”

Max Yuan and Isaac Westerback
“The Lorenz equation”

Brandon Delin and Frank Hawkins
“The Henon-Heiles potential”

Hanna Dahl and Paul Zebarth
“The Toda lattice”

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30th from 9:30am to 11:30am
in LI5002
(coffee and cookies provided)

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