Department of English Learner Outcomes

The current learner outcomes for the degrees in English are as follows:

Bachelor of Arts (English)

Students graduating with a Bachelor's degree in English are able to:

  • read texts of all kinds critically, and to assess their rhetorical, ideological and aesthetic strategies.
  • write well (grammatically correct, clear, effective prose).
  • communicate ideas effectively and coherently, in both the persuasive essay, and a variety of other forms.
  • identify the conventions of a variety of genres, both general (such as poetry) and specific (such as the sonnet), and to identify ways in which individual texts work within, or expand the definitions of,  that genre.
  • analyse specific literary devices and explain how those devices contribute to the meaning of a literary text. Explain the role of literature in articulating and creating categories of identity.
  • explain how a text is produced by, and produces, its historical and cultural context.
  • use library resources to research a topic and use what they discover to illuminate a text.
  • adapt the tools of literary analysis to cross-disciplinary inquiry.
  • apply their knowledge of how literature works to their own writing.

Honours Bachelor of Arts (English) 

Students graduating with a Honours Bachelor's degree in English are able to:

  • read texts of all kinds critically, and to assess their rhetorical, ideological and aesthetic strategies.
  • write well (grammatically correct, clear, effective prose).
  • communicate ideas effectively and coherently, in both the persuasive essay, and a variety of other forms 
  • identify the conventions of a variety of genres, both general (such as poetry) and specific (such as the sonnet), and to identify ways in which individual texts work within, or expand the definitions of, that genre.
  • analyse specific literary devices and explain how those devices contribute to the meaning of a literary text. Explain the role of literature in articulating and creating categories of identity 
  • explain how a text is produced by, and produces, its historical and cultural context.
  • use library resources to research a topic and use what they discover to illuminate a text.
  • adapt the tools of literary analysis to cross-disciplinary inquiry. Apply their knowledge of how literature works to their own writing.
  • read texts critically in a variety of historical contexts. Think independently and critically about literature and the issues raised by texts. Identify and assess the social, environmental and other ethical themes presented in texts.
  • analyse texts from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Research a topic and present their findings to a class of advanced English students lead class discussion effectively.
  • enter graduate studies in English (depending on final average).

Honours English students also have the option of developing advanced skills in more than one discipline, through combined Honours programs with French, History and Philosophy, and Women's Studies.

Concurrent Education Degrees in English (BA/BED; HBA/BED)

The English Department offers eight Concurrent Education degrees in conjunction with the Faculty of Education. In addition to the specific learner outcomes of the BA and HBA programs in which they are enrolled, graduates of the Concurrent Education programs in English are able to teach others about literature, writing, media studies, grammar and usage.

HBASc in English, and BASc and HBASc in Interdisciplinary Studies with a Specialization in English 

In addition to the BA and HBA English learner outcomes, students in the BASc and HBASc share these outcomes of the Interdisciplinary Studies program:

  • Scientific fluency: an understanding of scientific reasoning and the history of science. This objective is achieved by requiring students to take a minimum of 3.0 FCE in Area II (science), and by the frequent inclusion (and interrogation) of scientific issues in Area I (arts) courses.
  • Critical literacy: the evaluation of arguments, separation of logic from fallacy, persuasive accounts of reasoning. By working through complex problems and multiple knowledge bases, students are given an empowering context within which to become critical thinkers. This objective is achieved by requiring students to take 2 FCEs of Inquiry.
  • Cultural literacy: familiarity with the variability in cultural reasoning, and how this influences the humanities and the sciences. This objective is achieved by requiring students to take a minimum of 3.0 FCE in Area I, and by the attention given to humanities and social science issues by courses in Area II.
  • Environmental awareness: an ecological sensibility and sense of responsibility infused into work, study and life. This objective is met by the prominence accorded environmental issues in most courses. Community engagement: connecting one's endeavours to wider communities. This objective is met by the first- and fourth-year inquiry courses' topic foci.