Spring / Summer Courses 2021

All Spring/Summer English course material is available online through myCourseLink.

Spring term May 2 - June 13, 2022 (6 weeks)

ENGL 1015 SDE - Introduction to Academic Writing

           An introduction to university-level standards of composition, revision, editing, research, and documentation. A review of English grammar (word and sentence level) and rhetorical forms (paragraph level and beyond), and a study of the methods and conventions of academic argumentation and research, with an emphasis on finding and evaluating sources, formulating research questions, developing arguments, and composing various types of analyses including academic essays.

Note:  Students who have previous credit in English 1011, 1031, or 1500 may not take English 1015 for credit.

ENGL 1115 SDE - Introduction to Literary Theory

         An introduction to literary study, focusing on texts from the major genres (drama, poetry, prose) within their historical and cultural contexts. Emphasis will be given to the development of skills in critical analysis, research, writing, and documentation.

Note:  Students who have previous credit in English 1100, 1102, 1111 or 1112 may not take English 1115 for credit.

ENGL 1116 SDE - Native and Newcomer Literatures in Canada: Contact Zones

          An introduction to First Nations and settler literature in Canada, focusing on the ways in which the writing of these groups helps to define, negotiate, and critique the relationships between all Canadian treaty people. Texts from a variety of genres, such as fiction, travel and exploration narrative, life writing, poetry, songs, drama and film, will be studied in their historical, political, and cultural context.

Course Classifications: Type A: Humanities;  Type E: Indigenous Content

ENGL 2010 SDE - Special Topics: Epic: From the Aeneid to Hamilton

Epic Poetry will introduce students to the conventions of epic poetry in English. This course will explore many different aspects of epic poetry, including its development and trajectory in English, its varying forms, as well as the way that it reflects national mythologies. The course will draw parallels between works like The Aeneid and Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton (though parallels will be drawn without diminishing the hip-hop origins of the play/epic). What does epic mean (besides, often, very long)?

Prerequisite(s): One FCE in English at the first-year level or second-year standing, or permission of the Chair of the Department

ENGL 3050 SDE - Special Topics in Medieval Literatures: Viking Trouble                                                                In this course we will be looking at documents and images associated with the Viking Age. One of the main images of the U.S. Capitol Riots was of one particularly vocal leader, dubbed the QAnon Shaman, in a “Viking” helmet, sporting a large Thor’s hammer tattoo. Many of the white supremacist terrorists in recent memory, including the Christchurch shooter, evoke the Vikings in their literature. Viking scholars of colour and those who study queer Vikings are the object of persistent online hate. Nor is this a new phenomenon. But why do white supremacists feel like they own this history? Who really are the Vikings? The name is applied to both marauder and farmer. The Viking diaspora is huge, and study of the literature, archaeology and history allows a complex picture to emerge of cross-cultural contact. And what do white supremacists do with important primary sources like Ibn Fadlan, or the saga that tells the story of the Buddha? This course would study the Vikings, but also the long history of the politicization of the Vikings. Much of the early medieval world had to face “Viking Trouble”; is it not interesting that 1000 years later, we are still facing it?

Note: English 3050 counts toward fulfillment of the Area 1 requirement.

Prerequisite(s):  Two FCEs in English, including at least one half-course at the second-year level, or permission of the Chair of the Department

ENGL 3052 SDE - Special Topics in Global and Minority  Literatures:  Bodies & Belonging in World Literature

          This course will examine the ways that bodies are written in diasporic, postcolonial, and world literatures. How are sexuality and reproduction navigated in postcolonial and global literatures? How are authors constructing and deconstructing bodies in their work, and what does that say about power, identity, or belonging? How do theories of gender, sexuality, and identity intersect with global and local power structures within these works? Texts covered may include works such as Shani Mootoo's Cereus Blooms at Night, Alexis Wright's The Swan Book and many others.

Note: English 3052 counts toward fulfillment of the Area 3 requirement.

Prerequisite(s):  Two FCEs in English, including at least one half-course at the second-year level, or permission of the Chair of the Department

Summer Term - July 2 - July 22, 2022 (3 weeks)
ENGL 1015 ADF - Introduction to Academic Writing

           An introduction to university-level standards of composition, revision, editing, research, and documentation. A review of English grammar (word and sentence level) and rhetorical forms (paragraph level and beyond), and a study of the methods and conventions of academic argumentation and research, with an emphasis on finding and evaluating sources, formulating research questions, developing arguments, and composing various types of analyses including academic essays.

Note:  Students who have previous credit in English 1011, 1031, or 1500 may not take English 1015 for credit.

NOTE: Students in HBED only (3 weeks) Zoom   Summer Term – July 4 – 21, 2022 Monday – Thursday 5:00pm – 8:00pm.

Summer Term -  July 4 - August 15, 2022 (6 weeks)
ENGL 1015 ADE - Introduction to Academic Writing 

An introduction to university-level standards of composition, revision, editing, research, and documentation. A review of English grammar (word and sentence level) and rhetorical forms (paragraph level and beyond), and a study of the methods and conventions of academic argumentation and research, with an emphasis on finding and evaluating sources, formulating research questions, developing arguments, and composing various types of analyses including academic essays.

Note:  Students who have previous credit in English 1011, 1031, or 1500 may not take English 1015 for credit.

ENGL 1016 ADE - Introduction to Professional Writing 

          An introduction to professional-level standards of composition, revision, editing, research and documentation. A review of English grammar (word and sentence level), rhetorical forms (paragraph level and beyond), and a study of writing in a variety of professional contexts with an emphasis on assessing rhetorical situations and crafting messages to inform and persuade diverse audiences in a variety of forms and formats.

Note:  Students who have previous credit in English 1011, 1031, or 1500 may not take English 1016 for credit.

ENGL/MDST 1118 ADE - Introduction to Film Study

          An introduction to the practices of reading, analyzing, and writing critically about film. Elements including mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and sound will be examined. Film form and style in a variety of genres, such as the documentary, experimental film, narrative cinema, and animation, will be covered. Attention will be paid to the role of cinema, and cinema studies, as cultural institutions.

Cross-List: MDST 1118

Note:  Students who have previous credit in English 2901 may not take English 1118 for credit.

ENGL 2818 ADE - Writing Across Genres: Creative Writing                        

Instruction and practice in a range of literary genres focused on the craft of creative and expressive writing (plot, setting, characterization, point of view, dialogue, voice, and style). Genres studied may include: poetry, prose fiction, drama, fan fiction, and screenplay.

Prerequisite(s): One FCE in English at the first-year level or second-year standing, or permission of the Chair of the Department

ENGL 3036 ADE - Professional Writing: Digital Contexts

Practical training in the skills and craft of professional writing for digital formats, with a focus on web usability. Formats studied may include web and mobile content, social media, digital advertising, and public relations.

Prerequisite(s): Two FCEs in English, including at least one half-course at the second-year level, or permission of the Chair of the Department