PHYS 4113 FA Student Poster Presentations

Event Date: 
Friday, November 30, 2018 - 9:30am
Event Location: 
LI 5002
Event Contact Name: 
Dr. H. de Guise
Event Contact E-mail: 

The Department of Physics invites you to attend
STUDENT POSTER PRESENTATIONS:

Hunter Harris and Ari Boon
“The bouncing ball”

David Ricci and Tristen Thibault
“The restricted 3-body problem”

Max Yuan and Isaac Westerback
“The Lorenz equation”

Brandon Delin and Frank Hawkins
“The Henon-Heiles potential”

Hanna Dahl and Paul Zebarth
“The Toda lattice”

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30th from 9:30am to 11:30am
in LI5002
(coffee and cookies provided)

Campus: 

Department of Physics seminar presented by Dr. Werden J. Keeler entitled "High Performance Double-Confocal Micro-Raman System and Applications"

Event Date: 
Friday, November 9, 2018 - 3:30pm
Event Location: 
CB 4058
Event Contact Phone: 
807-343-8461
Event Contact E-mail: 


The Department of Physics invites you to attend
a seminar presented by:

DR. WERDEN J. KEELER
Professor Emeritus, Physics Dept., LU

entitled:

"High Performance Double-Confocal Micro-Raman System and Applications"

Friday, November 9, 2018  
at 3:30 pm in CB 4058

Abstract:  This is a report on the development of a high-brightness confocal micro-Raman system assembled from components found in most optics labs or readily available from various suppliers.  An assembly approach can reduce system cost significantly if the major components are already at hand.

Further, we show how a second confocal pinhole and two in-line Rayleigh rejection filters can improve overall signal-to-noise and low wavenumber signal recovery, with only minimal reduction in throughput to the detector.

Finally, we demonstrate the system performance using a series of `straight-forward' and `more challenging' sample types.

Campus: 

Department of Physics Seminar presented by Dr. M. Hawton / Dr. V. Debierre entitled "Maxwell Quantum Mechanics"

Event Date: 
Friday, October 26, 2018 - 3:30pm
Event Location: 
CB 4058
Event Contact Name: 
Physics Department
Event Contact Phone: 
(807) 343-8461

 
The Department of Physics
invites you to attend a seminar presented by:

Dr. Margaret Hawton
Professor Emeritus, Physics Dept., LU

Dr. Vincent Debierre
Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg

entitled:
  "Maxwell Quantum Mechanics"

Friday, October 26, 2018
 at 3:30 pm
in CB 4058

Campus: 

Department of Physics Thesis Defense presented by Alex Clésio Nunes Martins

Event Date: 
Friday, September 14, 2018 - 1:30pm
Event Location: 
CB 4058
Event Contact Name: 
Dr. G. Das
Event Contact E-mail: 

The Department of Physics invites you to attend a
thesis defense presented by:

ALEX CLESIO NUNES MARTINS
entitled

"Correspondence Rules in SU(3)"

Friday, September 14, 2018
1:30 p.m. in CB 4058

 

Campus: 

Department of Physics - Research Seminar in Biophysics presented by Dr. C. Dias

Event Date: 
Wednesday, July 25, 2018 - 1:00pm
Event Location: 
ATAC 2020
Event Contact Name: 
Dr. Apichart Linhananta
Event Contact Phone: 
807-343-8016
Event Contact E-mail: 

The Department of Physics invites you to attend a Research Seminar in Biophysics:

DR. CRISTIANO L. DIAS
Assistant Professor, Department of Physics
New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT)

"Computer simulation of the amyloid-beta protein associated with Alzheimer's disease"

Wednesday, July 25, 2018
at 1:00 p.m. in AT2020

Abstract: More than 20 different amyloid diseases have been identified to date including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. They represent a daunting challenge for society as  Alzheimer’s alone is expected to afflict 100 million patients by 2050. One of the hallmarks of these diseases is the accumulation of plaques around cells that disrupt healthy function of tissues and organs. These  plaques  emerge from a self-assembly process   in  which  peptides   aggregate into soluble  oligomers  and amyloid fibrils. Small compounds that can interact specifically with oligomers  and destabilize amyloid fibrils are expected to become an important part in the treatment for amyloid diseases.  Also, they may be used as templates for new generations of biomarkers in medical imaging[1].In this presentation, I will provide an overview of ongoing projects in my lab where we are using computer simulations of all-atom models to understand at the atomic level (i) peptide aggregation into oligomers and fibrils, (ii) how small compounds can be used to control this aggregation process, and (iii) toxic effects of amyloid aggregates on cell membraneIf time permits, I will also discuss ongoing efforts in my group to understand at the atomic level effects of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) on the stability of proteins [2]. TMAO has been related to cardiovascular diseases and it is known to stabilize native proteins against water stresses. A case in point is deep-sea  animals  that counteract effects of hydrostatic pressure by increasing the concentration of TMAO in their muscles.

Bio: Cristiano Dias is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics at the New Jersey Institute of Technology(NJIT).  He earned a PhD degree in Physics from McGill University and he has post-doctoral training from University of Toronto (in Biochemistry), Western University (in Applied Mathematics), and Freie Universitat Berlin (in Physics).  His research interests are in computational biophysics and they lie at the interface of Chemistry, Biology, and Physics. His group develops and uses multiscale models that can bridge atomistic and mesoscopic length scales to provide abetter understanding of biological systems.

[1] Klunk, William E.,et al. Imaging brain amyloid in Alzheimer's disease with Pittsburgh Compound- B. Annals  of  Neurology:Official Journal of  the American Neurological  Association and the Child Neurology Society 55, 306(2004).

[2]ZhaoqianSu, FarbodMahmoudinobar,and Cristiano Dias, Role of TMAO on the conformation ofpeptides and its implication for proteins, Phys. Rev.Letters 119, 108102(2017)

Campus: 

Department of Physics - Research Seminar presented by Dr. O. Semeniuk, Candidate for LU-TBRHRI Research Chair in Biophysics

Event Date: 
Friday, July 27, 2018 - 1:00pm
Event Location: 
ATAC 2020
Event Contact Name: 
Dr. Apichart Linhananta
Event Contact Phone: 
(807) 343-8016
Event Contact E-mail: 

 

The Department of Physics invites you to attend a Research Seminar by LU-TBRHRI Research Chair in Biophysics candidate:

DR. OLEKSII SEMENIUK
Postdoctoral Researcher
Medical Physics Department of Nova Scotia Health Authority

"Advanced photoconductors for radiation medical
imaging detectors"

Friday, July 27, 2018
at 1:00 p.m. in AT2020

Abstract:
Solid state X-ray detectors play an essential role in a variety of applications, ranging from domestic security and astronomy to nuclear research and medical imaging. While the radiation sensing technology has made significant progress over the last decade, the “heart” of the detector (i.e. radiation sensing medium) has experienced only modest changes. Indeed, commercially available large area direct and indirect-conversion detectors are traditionally based on layers of amorphous selenium (a-Se) and cesium iodide (CsI), respectively. Nowadays, the performance of these materials has probably reached its full potential, despite the critical need for further improvement in terms of X-ray dose used and image quality. This is of particular importance for diagnostic medical imaging where performance of medical imaging devices defines the ability to detect and diagnose medical conditions accurately and at the earliest stage of disease. The goal of my work is to develop and characterize the next generation of customized X-ray photoconductors to address these issues. My talk will be focused on the most promising novel materials, namely amorphous lead oxide (a-PbO) and cesium lead bromide (CsPbBr3) which uniquely allow to reduce the dose associated with X-ray imaging, while improving the diagnostic capabilities and lowering detector costs.

BIO: Dr. Oleksii Semeniuk is working as a postdoctoral researcher at the Medical Physics department of Nova Scotia Health Authority. The topic of his current research is development and characterization of a real-time monitoring system for cranial stereotactic radiosurgery. Oleksii completed his MSc and PhD at Lakehead University and his undergraduate at National Aviation University, Ukraine. His research interests lie in the area of radiation dose reduction for medical imaging applications. Particular, Oleksii is working on performance optimization of advanced X-ray photoconductors for utilization as X-ray-to-charge transducers in direct conversion detectors for fluoroscopy and general radiography.

Campus: 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS PRESENTS THE CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF PHYSICISTS (CAP) LECTURE SERIES: SPEAKER – DR. PIERRE GOREL

Event Date: 
Tuesday, March 6, 2018 - 10:00am
Event Location: 
RB 2042
Event Contact Name: 
Dr. Apichart Linhananta
Event Contact Phone: 
(807) 343-8016
Event Contact E-mail: 

THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS
presents the
CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF PHYSICISTS (CAP)
LECTURE TOUR

Guest Speaker:
DR. PIERRE GOREL
Research Scientist, SNOLAB

"Digging into Mysteries:  the Search for Dark Matter at SNOLAB "

click here for poster and abstract details
Tuesday, MARCH 6th, 2018
10:00 am
in RB 2042

Abstract:

Our understanding of the laws of physics has been going by leaps and bonds in the last century. The Standard Model of Particle Physics has been very successful, culminating with the discovery of the previously predicted Higgs boson. And yet… it is enough to look up and survey the sky to discover that this great achievement explains less than 5% of the Universe. Many clues point to the existence of five times more matter with no electromagnetic interaction, making it impossible to observe except for its effect on the gravity field. The most favored candidates for this “dark matter” are the Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). They would scatter off nuclei, producing detectable recoils. Over the last decades, a word-wide effort has taken to look for these particles, which have managed so far to stay elusive. As a results, the detectors have become bigger and bigger, reaching new levels of sensitivity. The corollary is that the “low background” requirement inherent to this kind of detector became more and more stringent, forcing experiment to be built with the thickest overburden possible to be protected against cosmic rays. In this landscape, SNOLAB is one of the best laboratories in the world. With more than 2 km of rock overburden in the heart of the Canadian Shield, the facility has been built on the success of the SNO experiment (Nobel prize cowinner 2015) and is dedicated to low background research. With 6 projects at various stages of readiness and operation, direct dark matter search occupies a place of choice in the physics program of SNOLAB, next to neutrino detection and biology. In this talk, I will discuss the recent results published by three of them.

Short bio:

Dr. Pierre Gorel graduated in 2002 from the Ecole Nationale Superieure d’Ingenieur de Caen (France) with a specialization in nuclear instrumentation and worked on ECR ion sources at the Grand Accelerateur National d’Ions Lourds (Caen, France). In 2006, he completed a PhD on the Search for T-violation in the decay of the free neutron at the Paul Sherrer Institut (Villigen, Switzerland) and the University of Caen. He then moved to astroparticle physics as a research associate at the University of Alberta. After a short stint on the neutrinoless double beta decay with the SNO+ collaboration, he focused his work on the direct search for dark matter by joining the DEAP project and leading several aspects of the DEAP-3600 detector construction. He is currently a research scientist at SNOLAB (Sudbury, Canada) and involved in the analysis of the DEAP data as well as the construction of the NEWS-G dark matter detector at SNOLAB.

Campus: 

Thesis Proposal

Event Date: 
Friday, March 21, 2014 - 11:30am to 12:30pm
Event Location: 
CB 4058
Event Contact Name: 
Kristine Carey
Event Contact Phone: 
343-8461

Chris Abraham will present "In vivo Quantification of aFunctionalAntibody-labelledSuper-Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Contrast Agent Targeting ProstateCancer CellsforMagneticResonance Imaging: NudeMouseStudy". Click here for more details.

Campus: 

Student Thesis Proposal

Event Date: 
Monday, September 15, 2014 - 12:00pm
Event Location: 
CB 4058

The Department of Physics invites you to attend a thesis proposal presentation by Avner Fitterman entitled Batch-mode polarizer optimization.

Campus: 

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