Spring / Summer Courses

All Spring/Summer English courses being offered are online through myCourseLink (D2L). Course outlines are posted on the myCourseLink (D2L) website.

All courses being offered in Spring term May 1 - June 12, 2018 are:

ENGL 1015 SDE - Introduction to Academic Writing  - Cindy Soldan

An introduction to university-level standards of composition, revision, editing, research, and documentation. A review of English grammar (word and sentence level) and rhetorical forms (paragraph level and beyond), and a study of the methods and conventions of academic argumentation and research, with an emphasis on finding and evaluating sources, formulating research questions, developing arguments, and composing various types of analyses including academic essays.

Note:  Students who have previous credit in English 1011, 1031, or 1500 may not take English 1015 for credit.

ENGL 2810 SDE - Gender, Sexuality and the Body in Literature and Culture  - Dr. Lesley Clement

An introduction to the role cultural texts play in constructions and understandings of gender, sexuality and the body and their historical and cultural variations. Topics to be covered may include diverse feminisms, masculinity, femininity, biology, queer studies, trans politics, and reproductive politics. These topics will be illuminated through a variety of cultural and theoretical texts.

Prerequisite(s):  One FCE in English at the first-year level, or Women’s Studies 1100, or second-year standing, or permission of the Chair of the Department of English

Notes:  Women’s Studies Group 1 course

ENGL 3052 SDE - Special Topics in Global and Minority Literatures: New Zealand Literature - Dr. Linda Rodenburg

This course focuses on the literatures and cultures of New Zealand, drawing on the wirtings of both Mãori and Pãkehã to discuss the postcolonial politics of identity. Reading works form a variety of genres and historical periods, students will engage critically with stories as they relate to identity and power relations.

Prerequisite(s):  Two FCEs in English, including at least one half-course at the second-year level, or permission of the Chair of the Department
Note: English 3052 counts toward fulfillment of the Area 3 requirement.

Summer Term - July 3 - August 14, 2018

ENGL 1015 ADE - Introduction to Academic Writing - Cindy Soldan

An introduction to university-level standards of composition, revision, editing, research, and documentation. A review of English grammar (word and sentence level) and rhetorical forms (paragraph level and beyond), and a study of the methods and conventions of academic argumentation and research, with an emphasis on finding and evaluating sources, formulating research questions, developing arguments, and composing various types of analyses including academic essays.

Note:  Students who have previous credit in English 1011, 1031, or 1500 may not take English 1015 for credit.

ENGL 2916 ADE - Popular Fiction - Dr. Holly Morgan

A study of popular texts. The role played by aesthetics in the evaluation of texts, as well as the relationship between “the popular” and “the literary,” and between "high" and "low" genres will be covered. Texts may include best-sellers, genre fiction, pulp fiction, romance, and television.

Prerequisite(s):  One FCE in English at the first-year level or second-year standing, or permission of the Chair of the Department

Note:  Students who have previous credit in English 3916 may not take English 2916 for credit.

ENGL 3911 ADE - Special Topics: History of English - Dr. Rhonda Dubec

This course provides a chronological study of the history of the English language from its Indo-European roots to the present. We move from the prehistory of English, through Old English (before 1100), Middle English (12th-15th c.) and Early Modern English (16th—18th c.), to Modern English 18th c. to present) and World Englishes. Considering the social and political factors affecting language change, we examine the change in sounds (phonology), in forms of words and endings (morphology), in sentence structure (syntax), in spelling (orthography), in meanings of words (semantics), and in vocabulary (lexicon). We end with a consideration of the global hegemony of English and the rise of world Englishes, looking forward to what “English” might be like in 100 years.

Prerequisite(s):Two FCEs in English, including at least one half-course at the second-year level, or permission of the Chair of the Department

ENGL 4010SA/SAO: Globalization - Dr. Anna Guttman – via telepresence to Orillia

Is globalization the happy melding of the world’s cultures?  Or a corporate-driven endeavour that will lead to both cultural and financial impoverishment for the world’s people?  How does it impact me as a student and scholar of English? How does globalization affect our understanding of cultural identity?  The nation?  Using both theories and case studies, this course will examine the interrelationship between the cultural and the economic and consider the ways in which globalization impacts the production, circulation and reception of literature and film.